John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on feeling, hope, regret, and religion

We must repeat the often repeated saying, that it is unworthy a religious man to view an irreligious one either with alarm or aversion, or with any other feeling than regret and hope and brotherly commiseration.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Burns. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on dreams and paradise

Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave A paradise for a sect.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Fall of Hyperion

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A Quote by John Keats on sleep

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Shed no tear - O, shed no tear! The flower will bloom another year. Weep no more - O, weep no more! Young buds sleep in the root's white core.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

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A Quote by John Keats on vanity and wisdom

I will give you a definition of a proud man: he is a man who has neither vanity nor wisdom - one filled with hatreds cannot be vain, neither can he be wise.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

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A Quote by John Keats on certainty, heart, imagination, and truth

I am certain of nothing but the Holiness of the Heart's affections and the Truth of the Imagination.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letter to Benjamin Bailey (22 November 1817)

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A Quote by John Keats on thought

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Sudden a thought came like a full-blown rose, Flushing his brow.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 16.

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A Quote by John Keats on death, earth, and poetry

The poetry of earth is never dead.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: On the Grasshopper and Cricket.

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A Quote by John Keats on anxiety, religion, and wishes

His religion at best is an anxious wish,-like that of Rabelais, a great Perhaps.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Burns. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on aphorisms, meaning, ridicule, and truth

We have oftener than once endeavoured to attach some meaning to that aphorism, vulgarly imputed to Shaftesbury, which however we can find nowhere in his works, that "ridicule is the test of truth."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Voltaire. Foreign Review, 1829.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on eternity, silence, speech, and time

Silence is deep as Eternity, speech is shallow as Time.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

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