John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on books, happiness, history, and people

Happy the people whose annals are blank in history-books.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Life of Frederick the Great. Book xvi. Chap. i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on play, sensuality, and spirit

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd, Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Ode on a Grecian Urn (1820)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats

That large utterance of the early gods!

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Hyperion. Book i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on body, books, dreams, lies, past, soul, and time

In books lies the soul of the whole Past Time: the articulate audible voice of the Past, when the body and material substance of it has altogether vanished like a dream.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Hero as a Man of Letters.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on feeling, hope, regret, and religion

We must repeat the often repeated saying, that it is unworthy a religious man to view an irreligious one either with alarm or aversion, or with any other feeling than regret and hope and brotherly commiseration.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Burns. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on dreams and paradise

Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave A paradise for a sect.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Fall of Hyperion

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A Quote by John Keats on good, kindness, love, sorrow, and thought

To sorrow I bade good-morrow, And thought to leave her far away behind; But cheerly, cheerly, She loves me dearly; She is so constant to me, and so kind.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Endymion. Book iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on eternity, silence, speech, and time

As the Swiss inscription says: Sprechen ist silbern, Schweigen ist golden,- "Speech is silvern, Silence is golden;" or, as I might rather express it, Speech is of Time, Silence is of Eternity.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sartor Resartus. Book iii. Chap. iii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats

He from forth the closet brought a heap Of candied apple, quince, and plum, and gourd; With jellies soother thank the creamy curd, And lucent syrops, tinct with cinnamon; Mama and dates, in argosy transferr'd From Fez; and spiced dainties, every one, From silken Samarcand to cedar'd Lebanon.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats

The stars look very cold about the sky, And I have many miles on foot to fare.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Keen, Fitful Gusts are Whispering Here and There

Contributed by: Zaady

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