John Donne

1572 - 1631

A Quote by John Donne on age, authors, books, god, justice, language, libraries, lies, mankind, and war

All mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated; God emploies several translators; some pieces are translated by age, some by sickness, some by war, some by justice; but God's hand is in every translation; and his hand shall bind up all our scattered leaves again, for that library where every book shall lie open to one another.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions, 1623

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, legends, love, and peace

We can die by it, if not live by love, And if unfit for tombs and hearse Our legend be, it will be fit for verse; And if no peace of chronicle we prove, We'll build in sonnet pretty rooms; As well a well wrought urne becomes The greatest ashes, as half-acre tombs.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Canonization

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on love

in

Come live with me, and be my love, And we will some new pleasures prove Of golden sands, and crystal brooks, With silken lines, and silver hooks.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Bait, st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on god and love

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I long to talk with some old lover's ghost, Who died before the god of love was born.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Love's Deity

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on love and nature

Nature's lay idiot, I taught thee to love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Elegies, no. 2, 7, Nature's Lay Idiot

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on rest

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My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest, Where can we find two better hemispheres Without sharp North, without declining West?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Good Morrow, st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, love, sexes, and wit

The Phoenix riddle hath more wit By us, we two being one, are it. So to one neutral thing both sexes fit, We die and rise the same, and prove Mysterious by this love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Canonization, st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, friendship, and mankind

No man is an Island, entire of it self; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friends or of thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankind; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions, XVII

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on heaven, love, and variety

The heavens rejoice in motion, why should I Abjure my so much loved variety.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Elegies, no. 17, Variety, L I

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on god and love

in

For God sake hold your tongue, and let me love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Canonization, st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

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