John Donne

1572 - 1631

A Quote by John Donne on love and nature

Nature's lay idiot, I taught thee to love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Elegies, no. 2, 7, Nature's Lay Idiot

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on rest

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My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest, Where can we find two better hemispheres Without sharp North, without declining West?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Good Morrow, st. 3

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A Quote by John Donne on death, love, sexes, and wit

The Phoenix riddle hath more wit By us, we two being one, are it. So to one neutral thing both sexes fit, We die and rise the same, and prove Mysterious by this love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Canonization, st. 3

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A Quote by John Donne on death, friendship, and mankind

No man is an Island, entire of it self; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friends or of thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankind; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions, XVII

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A Quote by John Donne

I have done one braver thing Than all the Worthies did; And yet a braver thence doth spring, Which is, to keep that hid.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Undertaking, st. I

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A Quote by John Donne on control, fear, good, love, soul, and world

And now good morrow to our waking souls, Which watch not one another out of fear; For love, all love of other sights controls, And makes one little room, an everywhere. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown, Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Good Morrow, st. 2

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A Quote by John Donne on death

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When I died last, and dear, I die As often as from thee I go.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Legacy, st. 1

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A Quote by John Donne on lies and love

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Whilst my physicians by their love are grown Cosmographers, and I their map, who lie Flat on this bed.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Hymn to God My God, in My Sickness, st. 2

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A Quote by John Donne on kiss and soul

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So, so, break off this last lamenting kiss, Which sucks two souls, and vapors both away.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Expiration, st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on ambition, contentment, doctors, funerals, satisfaction, and sermons

When my mouth shall be filled with dust, and the worm shall feed, and feed sweetly upon me, when the ambitious man shall have no satisfaction if the poorest alive tread upon him, nor the poorest receive any contentment in being made equal to princes, for they shall be equal but in dust. *Called by His Majesty's household the Doctors Own Funeral Sermon

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: XXVI Sermons, 1661, Death's Duel, last sermon, February 15, 1631*

Contributed by: Zaady

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