John Donne

1572 - 1631

A Quote by John Donne on art, chance, charm, fate, men, slavery, sleep, and war

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell, And poppy, or charms, can make us sleep as well, And better than thy stroke. Why swell'st thou then?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Holy Sonnets, No. 10

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne

Yesternight the sun went hence, And yet is here today.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Song (Sweetest Love, I Do Not Go) st. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, hope, love, and world

Sweetest love, I do not go, For weariness of thee, Nor in hope the world can show A fitter love for me; But since that I Must die at last, 'tis best, To use my self in jest Thus by feign'd deaths to die.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Song (Sweetest Love, I Do Not Go) st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne

The flea, though he kill none, he does all the harm he can.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, 1624, no. 12

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on christ and clarity

Show me, dear Christ, Thy spouse, so bright and clear.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Holy Sonnets, XVIII, 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on god and love

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I long to talk with some old lover's ghost, Who died before the god of love was born.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Love's Deity

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on love and nature

Nature's lay idiot, I taught thee to love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Elegies, no. 2, 7, Nature's Lay Idiot

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on rest

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My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest, Where can we find two better hemispheres Without sharp North, without declining West?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Good Morrow, st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, love, sexes, and wit

The Phoenix riddle hath more wit By us, we two being one, are it. So to one neutral thing both sexes fit, We die and rise the same, and prove Mysterious by this love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Canonization, st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, friendship, and mankind

No man is an Island, entire of it self; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friends or of thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankind; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions, XVII

Contributed by: Zaady

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