John Donne

1572 - 1631

A Quote by John Donne on eternity and time

Eternity is not an everlasting flux of time, but time is as a short parenthesis in a long period.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by John Donne on death, eternity, pictures, and soul

Death be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadfull, for, thou art not soe,
For, those, whom thou think'st, thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poore death, nor yet canst thou kill mee.
From rest and sleepe, which but thy pictures bee,
Much pleasure, then from thee, much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee doe goe,
Rest of their bones, and soules deliverie.
Thou art slave to Fate, Chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poyson, warre, and sicknesse dwell,
And poppie, or charmes can make us sleepe as well,
And better then thy stroake; why swell'st thou then?
One short sleepe past, wee wake eternally,
And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: http://quotations.about.com Death Be Not Proud

Contributed by: jagadish

A Quote by John Donne on life

in

All mankind is one volume. When one man dies, a chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language. And every chapter must be translated. God employs several translators; some pieces are translated by age, some by sickness, some by war, some by justice. But God's hand shall bind up all our scattered leaves again for that library where every book shall live open to one another

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: "84 Charing Cross Road"

Contributed by: E

A Quote by John Donne

Any man's death diminishes me, for I am involved in mankind; therefore do not send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee!

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Contributed by: Blake

A Quote by John Donne on love, tristan, and hippocrates

My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mix'd equally;
If our two loves be one, or thou and I
Love so alike that none can slacken, none can die.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Good Morrow

Contributed by: giygas

A Quote by John Donne

We think that Paradise and Calvary Christ's cross and Adam's tree, stood in one place; Look, Lord and find both Adams met in me: As the first Adam's sweat surrounds my face, may the last Adam's blood my soul embrace

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Contributed by: Rachael

A Quote by John Donne on god and world

in

It is too little to call man a little world; Except God, man is a diminutive to nothing.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Meditations, Mediation IV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death and mankind

Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankind; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne

I do nothing upon myself, and yet am mine own executioner.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Devotions XII

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on soul

in

If they be two, they are two so As stiff twin compasses are two, Thy soul the fixt foot, makes no show To move, but doth, if the other do.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: A Valediction Forbidding Mourning, st. 7

Contributed by: Zaady

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