John Daido Loori

A Quote by John Daido Loori on whole, interbeing, and connection

What transpires for the least significant member transpires at once for the whole.

John Daido Loori

Source: The True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen's Three Hundred Koans, Pages: 89

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by John Daido Loori on buddha, buddha nature, expression, phenomenon, sentient, and universe

Wordless is not the same of expressionless. All phenomenon of the universe, audible and inaudible, tangible and intangible, sentient and insentient, are the clear and ceaseless expression of the buddha nature.

John Daido Loori

Source: The True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen's Three Hundred Koans, Pages: 222

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by John Daido Loori on negation and silence

Words and ideas are a description of reality, silence is a negation of reality. What is the reality itself?

John Daido Loori

Source: The True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen's Three Hundred Koans, Pages: 222

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by John Daido Loori on dharma, experience, explanation, listening, awakening, and enlightenment

In transmitting the dharma, there is neither explanation nor teaching; there is neighter hearing nor attainment. Since explanations never really explains, nor are they able to teach, why talk about it? Since listening isn't really hearing or attaining anything, then why listen? But say, since it cannot be explained or heard, how can you enter the Way?

But down the bagagge, take of the blinders, and see for yourself that this very place is the valley of the endless spring, this very body is the body of the universe. At such a time, who is it who can accompany this?

John Daido Loori

Source: The True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen's Three Hundred Koans, Pages: 8

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by John Daido Loori on brambles, entanglements, freedom, and music

If you know the music the moment the violin string begins to vibrate, then you know how to navigate through the forest of brambles and entanglements with freedom and ease. If, on the other hand, you think that with practice the forest of brambles and entanglements will altogether disappear, then right from the beginning you are hopelessly entangled and won't find your way.

John Daido Loori

Source: The True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen's Three Hundred Koans, Pages: 169

Contributed by: Siona

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