John Burroughs

1837 - 1921

A Quote by John Burroughs on sap run, spring, and winter

Before the bud swells, before the grass springs, before the plough is started, comes the sugar harvest.  It is sequel of the bitter frost; a sap run is the sweet goodbye of winter.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Source: Phases of Farm Life

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by John Burroughs on diversity, infinity, intuition, life, mind, mystery, nature, religion, science, simplicity, unity, universe, and wonder

Science tends more and more to reveal to us the unity that underlies the diversity of nature.  We must have diversity in our practical lives; we must seize Nature by many handles.  But our intellectual lives demand unity, demand simplicity amid all this complexity.  Our religious lives demand the same.  Amid all the diversity of creeds and sects we are coming more and more to see that religion is one, that verbal differences and ceremonies are unimportant, and that the fundamental agreements are alone significant.  Religion as a key or passport to some other world has had its day; as a mere set of statements or dogmas about the Infinite mystery it has had its day.  Science makes us more and more at home in this world, and is coming more and more, to the intuitional mind, to have a religious value.  Science kills credulity and superstition but to the well-balanced mind it enhances the feeling of wonder, of veneration, and of kinship which we feel in the presence of the marvelous universe.  It quiets our fears and apprehensions, it pours oil upon the troubled waters of our lives, and reconciles us to the world as it is.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Source: Accepting the Universe

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by John Burroughs on life, nature, quest, spring, and stars

To see the fire that warms you or, better yet, to cut the wood that feeds the fire that warms you; to see the spring where the water bubbles up that slakes your thirst and to dip your pail into it; to see the beams that are the stay of your four walls and the timbers that uphold the roof that shelters you; to be in direct and personal contact with the sources of your material life; to find the universal elements enough; to find the air and the water exhilarating; to be refreshed by a morning walk or an evening saunter; to find a quest of wild berries more satisfying than a gift of tropical fruit; to be thrilled by the stars at night; to be elated over a bird's nest or a wild flower in spring - these are some of the rewards of the simple life.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Source: John Burroughs' America: Selections from the Writings of the Naturalist

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by John Burroughs on gold, love, patience, promises, sacrifice, self-sacrifice, service, work, and worth

For anything worth having one must pay the price; and the price is always work, patience, love, self-sacrifice - no paper currency, no promises to pay, but the gold of real service.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on birds, life, reward, simplicity, and water

To find the universal elements enough; to find the air and the water exhilarating; to be refreshed by a morning walk or an evening saunter . . . to be thrilled by the stars at night; to be elated over a bird's nest or a wildflower in spring - these are some of the rewards of the simple life.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on nature, order, and senses

I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on birds, feeling, home, nature, privacy, reflection, struggle, suffering, sympathy, and time

Nature comes home to one most when he is at home; the stranger and traveler finds her a stranger and traveler also. One's own landscape comes in time to be a sort of outlying part of himself; he has sowed himself broadcast upon it, and it reflects his own moods and feelings; he is sensitive to the verge of the horizon: cut those trees, and he bleeds; mar those hills, and he suffers. How has the farmer planted himself in his fields; builded himself into his stone walls, and evoked the sympathy of the hills by his struggle! This home feeling, this domestication of nature, is important to the observer. This is the birdlime with which he catches the bird; this is the private door that admits him behind the scenes.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on time

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Now is the time of the illuminated woods . . . when every leaf glows like a tiny lamp.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on divinity, life, and power

The lesson which life repeats and constantly enforces is 'look under foot.' You are always nearer the divine and the true sources of your power than you think.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on difficulty and opportunity

The lure of the distant and the difficult is deceptive. The great opportunity is where you are.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

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