Jim Collins

A Quote by Jim Collins on greatness and progress

You must ask, "What do we mean by great results?" Your goals don't have to be quantifiable, but they do have to be describable. Some leaders try to insist, "The only acceptable goals are measurable," but that's actually an undisciplined statement. Lots of goals—beauty, quality, life change, love—are worthy but not quantifiable. But you do have to be able to tell if you're making progress.

Jim Collins

Source: The Good to Great Pastor: An Interview with Jim Collins: http://www.christianitytoday.com/le/2006/002/7.48.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins on decisions and leadership

I've never found an important decision made by a great organization that was made at a point of unanimity. Significant decisions carry risks and inevitably some will oppose it. In these settings, the great legislative leader must be artful in handling uncomfortable decisions, and this requires rigor.

Jim Collins

Source: The Good to Great Pastor: An Interview with Jim Collins: http://www.christianitytoday.com/le/2006/002/7.48.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins on questions, new year, resoltuion, business, passion, work, and flow

The start of the New Year is a perfect time to start a stop doing list and to make this the cornerstone of your New Year resolutions, be it for your company, your family or yourself. It also is a perfect time to clarify your three circles, mirroring at a personal level the three questions...

1) What are you deeply passionate about?
2) What are you are genetically encoded for -- what activities do you feel just "made to do"?
3) What makes economic sense -- what can you make a living at?

Those fortunate enough to find or create a practical intersection of the three circles have the basis for a great work life.

Jim Collins

Source: Jim Collins: Best New Year's Resolution? A 'stop doing' list: http://www.jimcollins.com/lib/articles.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins on will, humility, leadership, ceo, and success

The best CEOs in our research display tremendous ambition for their company combined with the stoic will to do whatever it takes, no matter how brutal (within the bounds of the company's core values), to make the company great. Yet at the same time they display a remarkable humility about themselves, ascribing much of their own success to luck, discipline and preparation rather than personal genius.

Jim Collins

Source: Q&A with management guru Jim Collins: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2007/02/19/8400260/index.htm

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins on leaders, leadership, business, and humility

Level 5 leaders are differentiated from other levels of leaders in that they have a wonderful blend of personal humility combined with extraordinary professional will. Understand that they are very ambitious; but their ambition, first and foremost, is for the company's success. They realize that the most important step they must make to become a Level 5 leader is to subjugate their ego to the company's performance. When asked for interviews, these leaders will agree only if it's about the company and not about them.

Jim Collins

Source: "Taking Good to Great" - An Interview with Jim Collins

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins on company, entrepreneurship, and team

First figure out your partners, then figure out what ideas to pursue. The most important thing isn't the market you target, the product you develop or the financing, but the founding team.

Jim Collins

Source: Q&A with management guru Jim Collins: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2007/02/19/8400260/index.htm

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins on teamwork, ceo, and leadership

There is a direct relationship between the absence of celebrity and the presence of good-to-great results. Why? First, when you have a celebrity, the company turns into "the one genius with 1,000 helpers." It creates a sense that the whole thing is really about the CEO. At a deeper level, we found that for leaders to make something great, their ambition has to be for the greatness of the work and the company, rather than for themselves. That doesn't mean that they don't have an ego. It means that at each decision point -- at each of the critical junctures when Choice A would favor their ego and Choice B would favor the company and the work -- time and again the good-to-great leaders pick Choice B. Celebrity CEOs, at those same decision points, are more likely to favor self and ego over company and work.

Jim Collins

Source: Fast Company: Good to Great: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/51/goodtogreat.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins on business, people, team, and leadership

If I were running a company today, I would have one priority above all others: to acquire as many of the best people as I could. I'd put off everything else to fill my bus. Because things are going to come back. My flywheel is going to start to turn. And the single biggest constraint on the success of my organization is the ability to get and to hang on to enough of the right people.

Jim Collins

Source: Fast Company: Good to Great: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/51/goodtogreat.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Collins

GOOD IS THE ENEMY OF GREAT. And that  is one of the key reasons why we have so little that becomes great. We don't have great schools, principally because we have good schools. We don't have great government, principally because we have good government. Few people attain great lives, in large part because it is just so easy to settle for a good life. The vast majority of organizations never become great, precisely because the vast majority become quite good-and that is the main problem.

Those who built the good-to-great companies, however, made as much use of "stop doing" lists as "to do" lists. They displayed a remarkable discipline to unplug all sorts of extraneous junk.

Jim Collins

Source: Jim Collins, Good to Great

Contributed by: Curtis

A Quote by Jim Collins on visionary companies, visionary, yin, yang, both, and and

A visionary company doesn't seek balance between short-term and long-term, for example. It seeks to do well in the short-term and in the long-term. A visionary company doesn't simply balance between idealism and profitability: it seeks to be highly idealistic and highly profitable. A visionary company doesn't simply balance between preserving a tightly held core ideology and stimulating vigorous change and movement; it does both to an extreme. In short, a visionary company doesn't want to blend yin and yang into a grey, indistinguishable circle that is neither highly yin nor highly yang; it aims to be distinctly yin and distinctly yang -- both at the same time, all the time.

Jim Collins

Source: Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies (Harper Business Essentials), Pages: 44,45

Contributed by: Siona

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