Jean Baptiste Moliere

1622 - 1673

A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére

On some preference esteem is based, to esteem everything is to esteem nothing.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Source: Le Misanthrope, 1666, act I, sc. i

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on world

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I will maintain it before the whole world.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Source: Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, 1670, act IV, sc. v

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on eternity and friendship

My fair one, let us swear an eternal friendship.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Source: Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, 1670, act IV, sc. i

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on fear, good, hope, and love

Fear less, hope more; Whine less, breathe more; Talk less, say more; Hate less, love more; And all good things are yours.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on sons

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You are a fool in four letters, my son.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Source: Tartuffe, 11664, act I, sc. i

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on responsibility

It is not only for what we do that we are held responsible, but also for what we do not do.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on cats and proverbs

To pull the chestnuts out of the fire with the cat's paw. Proverb in many languages.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Source: L'Étourdi, 1655, act III, sc. vi

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on children

Ah, there are no longer any children!

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Source: Le Malade Imaginaire, 1673, act II, sc. xi

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A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on soul

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Cover that bosom that I must not see: souls are wounded by such things.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Source: Tartuffe, 11664, act III, sc. ii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on honor, lust, and privacy

Then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honor turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust. The grave's a fine and private place But none, I think, do there embrace.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Contributed by: Zaady

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