Jane Austen

1775 - 1817

A Quote by Jane Austen on fortune, good, possessions, truth, and wives

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Pride and Prejudice

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on laughter, neighbors, and sports

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn?

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on excellence, power, and sexes

In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided among the sexes.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Northanger Abbey, 1818

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on pity

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Those who do not complain are never pitied.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Pride & Prejudice, 1813.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on pity and suffering

Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on correction

Where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Mary Crawford, in Mansfield Park, ch. 11, 1814.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on appearance, boasts, and humility

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Darcy, in Pride and Prejudice, ch. 10, 1813.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on belief, nations, and rest

It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen on approval

How quick come the reasons for approving what we like.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Austen

Lady Middleton . . . exerted herself to ask Mr. Palmer if there was any news in the paper. 'No none at all,' he replied, and read on.

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

Source: Sense and Sensibility

Contributed by: Zaady

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