Ibn Ata'Allah

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on divinity, emptiness, and heart

When the heart becomes empty, the mimbar of the Divine Oneness is placed therein and the sultan of gnosis sits upon it.

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 90

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on achievement, god, heart, hypocrisy, impossibility, interest, love, praise, purpose, reason, and worship

It is impossible that this gnosis resulting in the heart should be achieved by man for any other purpose than to obey God, love Him, and worship Him. This gnosis should be sought for the sake of God, not for any other reason whatsoever, unlike the remaining external acts of devotion, which can be performed for other worldly interests, such as hypocrisy, praise, and commendation.

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 159

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on compassion, earth, god, and heaven

The covenant of your servanthood is that you be a servant to God, not to someone else, and that you know that everything except God is a servant to God, as He Most High has said, "There is none in the heaven and the earth but cometh unto the Compassionate as a servant."

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 159

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on devil, egotism, and support

Whenever there remains any support for the ego within, even if it be only an atom's weight, then you are pretentious and have a devil who leads you astray.

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 101

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on art, god, impossibility, knowledge, logic, prophets, reason, saints, and senses

Imam al-Ghazali: God is much too great for the senses to reach Him or for reason and logic to plumb the depths of His Majesty. Indeed, He is much too great for anyone but Himself to plumb the depths of His Majesty or for anyone but Himself to know Him. Verily, no one knows God but God. The highest degree of gnosis that His servants can attain is the realization that true gnostic knowledge of Him is impossible for them. Furthermore, no one can know that in its totality except a Prophet of a righteous saint (siddiq). As for the Prophet, he has clearly expressed this by saying, "I cannot enumerate the ways of praising Thee; Thou art as Thou has praised Thyself." As for the righteous saint, he says, "The incapacity to attain realization is a realization."

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 113

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on contentment, egotism, evil, god, good, leadership, needs, obstacles, people, relationships, reputation, and separation

Among their attributes: renouncing both worlds from their hearts, and preferring their brethren among God's creatures to what they possess; relying upon God Most High in all their affairs; being content with everything that happens to them which the ego detests; and bearing patiently sufferings and separation from one's homeland. They dissociate themselves from creatures without believing that there is evil in them, but rather out of preference for the Creator over creatures. They sever relationships, surmount obstacles, and strive in fulfilling the needs of people after emptying themselves: for whosoever strives to do that before emptying himself is actually seeking leadership and a good reputation.

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 128

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on beauty, fear, god, hope, journeys, mystery, science, sincerity, and worship

Know that the science of unveiling has no end to it, for it consists in the journey of the intellect in the stations of Majesty, Beauty, Sublimeness, Grandeur, and Holiness. . . . He to whom the mysteries of La ilaha illa'llah are revealed draws near to God, and his worship of God becomes sincere. He does not turn to anyone but to Him, nor does he have hope in or fear other than Him, nor does he see harm or benefit except as coming from Him. He abandons whosoever is not He and rids himself of inward and outward associationism (shirk).

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 140

Contributed by: Zaady

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