Ibn al-'Arabi

1165 - 1240

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on beauty, divinity, experience, investment, love, perception, soul, and world

The Image is not outside him, but within his being; better still, it is his very being, the form of the divine Name which he himself brought with him in coming into being. And the circle of the dialectic of love closes on this fundamental experience: "Love is closer to the lover than is his jugular vein." So excessive is this nearness that it acts at first as a veil. That is why the inexperienced novice, though dominated by the Image which invests his whole inner being, goes looking for it outside of himself, in a desperate search from form to form of the sensible world, until he returns to the sanctuary of his soul and perceives that the real Beloved is deep within his own being; and, from that moment on, he seeks the Beloved only through the Beloved . . . the active subject within him remains the inner image of unreal Beauty, a vestige of the transcendent or celestial counterpart of his being. . . .

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 156-7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on belief, faith, justice, and knowledge

Every servant professes a special belief in his Lord, of whom he asks assistance according to the knowledge he has of himself. Thus the faiths differ with the Lords, just as the Lords differ, although all the faiths are forms of the one faith, just as all the Lords are forms in the mirror of the Lord of Lords. . . .

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 310

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on certainty, god, names, obligation, time, and worship

God is not limited to the manner in which He is epiphanized for you and makes Himself adequate to your dimension {to receive Him}. And that is why other creatures are under no obligation to obey the God who demands your worship, because their theophanies take other forms. The form in which He is epiphanized to you is different from that in which He is epiphanized to others. God as such transcends (munazzah) all intelligible, imaginable, or sensible forms, but considered in His Names and Attributes, that is, His theophanies, He is, on the contrary, inseparable from these forms, that is, from a certain figure and a certain situs in space and time.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 310

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on earth, faith, god, heart, heaven, and reflection

"Neither my Heaven nor my Earth contains me, but the heart of my faithful believer contains me," this because the heart is a mirror in which the manifested "Form of God" is at each moment reflected on the scale of the microcosm.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 196

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on awareness, jealousy, love, and soul

The Lord to his devotee: Love me, love me alone. Love yourself in me, in me alone. Attach yourself to me, No one is more inward than I. Others love you for their own sakes, I love you for yourself. And you, you flee from me. Dearly beloved! ... if you approach me, It is because I have approached you. I am nearer to you than yourself, Than your soul, than your breath. Who among creatures Would treat you as I do? I am jealous of you over you, I want you to belong to no other, Not even to yourself. Be mine, be for me as you are in me, Though you are not even aware of it.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. pp. 174-5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, experience, fatherhood, glory, god, inspiration, privacy, reflection, solution, and time

Averroes (an integrist Aristotelian master): What manner of solution have you found through divine illumination and inspiration? Is it identical with that which we obtain from speculative reflection? Ibn 'Arabi (a young man about 20 years old): Yes and no. Between the yes and the no, spirits take their flight from their matter, and heads are separated from their bodies. Averroes (in a private interview with Ibn 'Arabi's father): Glory be to God who has let me live at a time distinguished by one of the masters of this experience {i.e. Ibn 'Arabi}, one of those who open the locks of His gates. Glory be to God who has accorded me the personal favor of seeing one of them with my own eyes.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 42

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on companions, knowledge, love, and power

The personal Lord speaks only in symbols; his eloquence is all in enigmas. And at a mysterious sign of recognition the visionary is overwhelmed by such a power of love that he loses consciousness. When he comes to himself, his Companion reveals to him: "I am knowledge, I am he who knows and I am what is known."

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 279

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, god, names, reflection, and relationships

God (al-Haqq) is your mirror, that is the mirror in which you contemplate your self (nafs, anima), and you, you are His mirror, that is the mirror in which He contemplates His divine Names. . . . Here we have a reciprocal relationship as between two mirrors facing one another and reflecting the same image back and forth.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 271

Contributed by: Zaady

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