Ibn al-'Arabi

1165 - 1240

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on children, christ, compassion, death, divinity, eternity, heart, inspiration, investment, nature, secrets, soul, and spirituality

Indeed as Jalaluddin Rumi also says, each of our eternal individualities is a word, a divine Word, emitted by the Breath of Divine Compassion. When this Word penetrates the mystic's heart... that is, when the "secret of his Lord" unfolds to his consciousness, when divine inspiration invests his heart and soul, "his nature is such that there is born within him a spiritual Child (walad ma'nawi) having the breath of Christ which resuscitates the dead."

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 172

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on beginning, death, direction, divinity, faith, knowledge, spirituality, vision, and world

When the Divine Being is epiphanized to the believer in the form of his faith, this faith is true. He professes this faith in this world. But when the veil is lifted in the other world, the knot ('aqd), that is to say, the dogma ('aqida) which binds him to his particular faith, is untied; dogma gives way to knowledge by direct vision (mushahada). For the man of authentic faith, capable of spiritual vision, this is the beginning of an ascending movement after death.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 205

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on awareness, divinity, god, love, soul, and spirituality

God epiphanizes Himself to the soul according to the essence of that soul, which is at once physical and spiritual. Then the soul becomes aware that it sees God, but through Him, not through itself; it loves only Him, not through itself, but in such a way that it is He who loves Himself; it is not the soul which loves Him; it contemplates God in every being, but thanks to a gaze which is the divine gaze itself. It becomes aware that He loves no other than Himself; He is the Lover and the Beloved, He who seeks and He who is sought.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 332, quoting "Futuhat"

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on books, christianity, direction, faith, garden, heart, laws, love, and religion

O marvel! a garden among the flames... My heart has become capable of all forms. It is a meadow for gazelles and a monastery for Christian monks, A temple for idols and the pilgrim's Ka'aba, The Tables of the Law and the book of the Koran. I profess the religion of Love, and whatever direction Its steed may take, Love is my religion and my faith.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p.135, quoting from"Diwan"

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on action, egotism, reflection, and secrets

The Beloved becomes a mirror reflecting the secret face of the mystic lover, while the lover, purified of the opacity of his ego, becomes in turn a mirror of the attributes and actions of the Beloved.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 71

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, heart, mystery, and spirituality

The mystic Ka'aba is the heart of being. It has been said to him: "The Temple which contains Me is in your heart." The mystery of the Divine Essence is no other than the Temple of the heart, and it is around the heart that the spiritual pilgrim circumambulates.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. pp. 279-280

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, eternity, god, perception, universe, and world

Everything we call other than God, everything we call the universe, is related to the Divine Being as the shadow to the person. The world is God's shadow. . . . The shadow is at once God and something other than God. Everything we perceive is the Divine Being in the eternal hexeities of the possibles.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 191

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, experience, fatherhood, glory, god, inspiration, privacy, reflection, solution, and time

Averroes (an integrist Aristotelian master): What manner of solution have you found through divine illumination and inspiration? Is it identical with that which we obtain from speculative reflection? Ibn 'Arabi (a young man about 20 years old): Yes and no. Between the yes and the no, spirits take their flight from their matter, and heads are separated from their bodies. Averroes (in a private interview with Ibn 'Arabi's father): Glory be to God who has let me live at a time distinguished by one of the masters of this experience {i.e. Ibn 'Arabi}, one of those who open the locks of His gates. Glory be to God who has accorded me the personal favor of seeing one of them with my own eyes.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 42

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on companions, knowledge, love, and power

The personal Lord speaks only in symbols; his eloquence is all in enigmas. And at a mysterious sign of recognition the visionary is overwhelmed by such a power of love that he loses consciousness. When he comes to himself, his Companion reveals to him: "I am knowledge, I am he who knows and I am what is known."

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 279

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, god, names, reflection, and relationships

God (al-Haqq) is your mirror, that is the mirror in which you contemplate your self (nafs, anima), and you, you are His mirror, that is the mirror in which He contemplates His divine Names. . . . Here we have a reciprocal relationship as between two mirrors facing one another and reflecting the same image back and forth.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 271

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content