Hugh B. Brown

1883 - 1975

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on clarity, language, originality, solitude, soul, and truth

Sometimes during solitude I hear truth spoken with clarity and freshness; uncolored and untranslated it speaks from within myself in a language original but inarticulate, heard only with the soul, and I realize I brought it with me, was never taught it nor can I efficiently teach it to another.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on belief, birth, children, creation, death, doubt, enemies, environment, existence, fatherhood, fear, god, home, ideas, life, men, mind, motherhood, needs, preparation, sister, spirituality, wonder, and world

Some men fear death, and sometimes they feel that it is an awful enemy; there are those who say they do not believe there is anything beyond the grave, that they think death ends conscious existence. I doubt very much if any man really believes that, as the idea of complete annihilation is one that cannot be entertained by the mind of man, when referring to himself. But men say they are afraid of that other world because they don't know much about it; they don't know what it will be like; and they fear the unknown. But really, brethren and sisters, do we not know as much about the world into which we are going as we knew about this one when we came into it? If an unborn babe could speak and it should be told that it must be bom into an unknown world, it would doubtless say, "I must not be separated from my mother or I will die. I depend upon her for my life. I must not be bom, as you call it, for that would be death," and yet, we know that if the child were not bom in due course it would die. The remarkable thing is that when it is bom the little child finds itself possessed of faculties and organs that begin to function only after birth-organs which were in process of creation during the pre-natal period but not intended to function until after birth. How wise our Heavenly Father is in making provision for the unborn babe to come into an environment where it can feel at home, and where its every need has been anticipated. I wonder whether we are now preparing-in this figuratively speaking pre-natal life-to be bom into the new and more glorious world. When we are born into that life, I think we shall find that God has prepared us for that birth-we shall find ourselves possessed of spiritual organs, so to speak, which will function fully as we become adapted to a purely spiritual environment. Then we shall refer to that transition as birth, not death. I am sure that he who made provision for our coming here has made provision for our going there.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on art, change, children, christ, cities, day, greed, heart, home, labor, life, lust, mankind, men, painting, sons, trouble, wine, and work

An old priest told me this story. "Centuries ago a great artist was engaged to paint a mural for the cathedral in a Sicilian town. The subject was the life of Christ. For many years the artist labored diligently, and finally the painting was finished except for the two most important figures: the Christ Child and Judas Iscariot. He searched far and wide for suitable models. "One day while walking in the city he came upon some children playing in the street. Among them was a 12-year-old boy whose face stirred the painter's heart. "The artist took the child home with him, and day after day the boy sat patiently until the face of the Christ Child was finished. But the painter still had found no model for the portrait of Judas. "The story of the unfinished masterpiece spread afar, and many men, fancying themselves of wicked countenance, offered to pose for Judas. But in vain the old painter looked for Judas, as he envisioned him-a man warped by life, enfeebled by surrender to greed and lust. "Then one afternoon as he sat in a tavern, a gaunt and tattered figure staggered across the threshold. 'Wine, wine,' he begged. The startled painter looked into a face that seemed to bear the marks of every sin of mankind. "Greatly excited, the old painter said, 'Come with me, and I will give you wine.' "For many days the painter worked feverishly to complete his masterpiece. As the work went on, a change came over the model. A strange tension replaced the stuporous languor, and his bloodshot eyes were fixed with horror on the painted likeness of himself. One day, perceiving his subject's agitation, the painter paused in his work. 'My son,' he said, 'what troubles you so?' "The man buried his face in his hands, sobbing. After a long moment he lifted pleading eyes to the old painter's face. "'Do you not then remember me? Years ago I was your model for the Christ Child.'"

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Source: The Abundant Life, p.228, quoting an article by Bonnie Chamberlin printed in Saturday Review

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on character and water

Even as water carves monuments of stone, so do our thoughts shape our character.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on diaries

in

Every man is a diary in which he writes one story while intending to write another. His humblest moment is when he compares the two.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on heart, nobility, and purity

If you are to be among the noble you must be noble. If you are to be among the wise, you must be wise, if you would be among the pure in heart, you must be pure in heart.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Source: Anonymous, quoted by Hugh B. Brown in The Abundant Life, p. 67.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on birds, brothers, day, faith, fear, goals, god, good, heart, humor, intelligence, jokes, laughter, life, men, needs, optimism, people, pessimism, relationships, sense of humor, skepticism, soul, tolerance, and women

A sense of relationship and copartnership with God involves the concept of universal brotherhood and that will help to develop intelligent tolerance, open-mindedness, and good-natured optimism. Life is really a battle between fear and faith, pessimism and optimism. Fear and pessimism paralyze men with skepticism and futility. One must have a sense of humor to be an optimist in times like these. And you young women will need a sense of humor if you marry these young men and try to live with them. Golden Kimball once said in a conference, "The Lord Himself must like a joke or he wouldn't have made some of you people." But your good humor must be real, not simulated. Let your smiles come from the heart and they will become contagious. You may see men on the street any day whose laugh is only a frozen grin with nothing in it but teeth. Men without humor tend to forget their source, lose sight of their goal, and with no lubrication in their mental crankshafts, they must drop out of the race. Lincoln said, "Good humor is the oxygen of the soul." And someone paraphrased, "The surly bird catches the germ."

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Source: The Abundant Life, p. 50.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on affection, belief, confession, discovery, facts, fatherhood, fear, fighting, forgiveness, friendship, god, honesty, hope, life, meditation, pain, prayer, quiet, religion, repentance, soul, time, and understanding

In attempting to develop a life of prayer, one becomes conscious of the fact that he is two persons, and this is true of all of us. There is our outside self, the person who is seen and watched by others, who lives and speaks and acts in public, the person we reveal to others with varying degrees of frankness or affectation. And there is that other self - the inner self, which is ever partly hidden even from our closest friends, and which we, ourselves, but dimly apprehend. It is this self, our better self, that the Master sees and values. To him the door of this interior castle is always open. He sees the real person. He knows that the fiercest battles are fought in this 'Sector of the Soul,' and he whispers hope to all who have not surrendered there. . . . "It was this understanding of the inner man which caused him to advise us to go alone into our closets and close the door when we would commune with the Father. Man, when alone with God, knows there can be no pretense, or make believe. Here at least he is absolutely honest. 'We feel the thing-we- ought-to-be beating beneath the thing-we-are.' Realizing that he knows before we tell him, we lay bare our souls to God. It is the antiseptic washing of the wound which makes healing possible, and in religion this is called repentance, and forgiveness. It is a time when our souls are naked and perhaps ashamed, but, when no longer distracted by fear of discovery, we can really concentrate on prayer. Rich and radiant living is generated in the hour of quiet meditation, of self-examination, of confession of weaknesses and prayer for forgiveness. This searching of our own souls and admitting what we see, is sometimes painful, but its effects are healing and wholesome. Probing a wound is sometimes more beneficial than applying an ointment.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Source: Hugh B. Brown, from a radio address, in Messages of Inspiration, p. 244.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on belief, children, god, men, and spirit

We believe that all men are the spirit children of God, created in his image. This concept is supported by the Holy Bible from Genesis to Revelation.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on assumptions, church, facts, history, prophets, and sacred

Prophecy and history predict and record a great and universal apostasy which was to be followed by a restoration as predicted by John in Revelation. The fact of the great apostasy is attested by both sacred and secular writ, and history bears witness that it became universal. We proclaim this fact of history not as an attack on any church. We do not assume any position of "holier than thou" or "wiser than thou," but we announce this historic fact of the apostasy as a vindication of the claim that there has been in fact a restoration of the gospel.

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Source: “The Abundant Life,” p. 54

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content