Huang Po

A Quote by Huang Po on huang po, buddhism, zen, mind, void, enlightenment, stillness, and thinking

The approach to it  ( Mind, Absolute, Void, Buddha Nature, Enlightenment )  is called the Gateway of the Stillness beyond all Activity.  If you wish to understand, know that a sudden comprehension comes when the mind has been purged of all the clutter of conceptual and discriminatory thought-activity.  Those who seek the truth by means of the intellect and learning only get further and further away from it.  Not till your thoughts cease all their branching here and there, not till you abandon all thoughts of seeking for something, not till your mind is motionless as wood or stone, will you be on the right road to the Gate.

Huang Po

Source: The Zen Teachings of Huang Po - on the Transmission of Mind - translation by John Blofeld

Contributed by: ROD

A Quote by Huang Po on huang po, buddhism, zen, mind, void, enlightenment, perception, and one

A perception  (experience), sudden as blinking, that subject and object are one, will lead to a deeply mysterious wordless understanding; and by this understanding will you awake to the truth of Zen.

Huang Po

Source: The Zen Teachings of Huang Po - on the Transmission of Mind - translation by John Blofeld

Contributed by: ROD

A Quote by Huang Po on huang po, buddhism, zen, mind, void, and enlightenment

As soon as the mouth is opened, evils spring forth.  People either neglect the root and speak of the branches, or neglect the reality of the 'illusory' world and speak only of Enlightenment.  Or else they chatter of cosmic activities leading to transformations, while neglecting the Substance from which they spring---indeed, there is NEVER any profit in discussion.

Huang Po

Source: The Zen Teachings of Huang Po - on the Transmission of Mind - translation by John Blofeld

Contributed by: ROD

A Quote by Huang Po on huang po, buddhism, zen, mind, void, enlightenment, nature, perception, phenomenon, and universal

The nature of the Absolute is neither perceptible nor imperceptible; and with phenomena it is just the same.  But to one who has discovered his real nature, how can there be anywhere or anything separate from it?...

...Therefore it is said:  'The perception of a phenomenon IS the perception of the Universal Nature, since phenomena and Mind are one and the same.'

Huang Po

Source: The Zen Teachings of Huang Po - on the Transmission of Mind - translation by John Blofeld

Contributed by: ROD

A Quote by Huang Po on huang po, buddhism, zen, mind, void, enlightenment, concepts, and wisdom

...concepts are related to the senses; and, when feeling takes place, wisdom is shut out.

Huang Po

Source: The Zen Teachings of Huang Po - on the Transmission of Mind - translation by John Blofeld

Contributed by: ROD

A Quote by Huang Po on huang po, buddhism, zen, mind, void, and enlightenment

If, conceiving of the phenomenal world as illusion, we try to shut it out, we make a false distinction between the 'real' and the 'unreal'.  So we must not shut anything out, but try to reach the point where all distinctions are seen to be void, where nothing is seen as desirable or undesirable, existing or not existing.  Yet  this does not mean that we should make our minds blank, for then we should be no better than blocks of wood or lumps of stone;  moreover, if we remain in this state, we should not be able to deal with the circumstances of daily life or be capable of observing the Zen precept:  ' When hungry, eat.'  Rather, we must cultivate dispassion, realizing that none of the attractive or unattractive attributes of things have any absolute existence.

Huang Po

Source: The Zen Teachings of Huang Po - on the Transmission of Mind - translation by John Blofeld

Contributed by: ROD

A Quote by Huang Po

One Mind
Regarding this Zen Doctrine of ours, since it was first trasmitted, it has never been taught that men should seek for learning or form concepts. "Studying the Way" is just a figure of speech. It is a method of arousing people's interest in the early stages of their development. In fact, the Way is not something which can be studied. Study leads to the retention of concepts and so the Way is entirely misunderstood. Moreover, the Way is not something specially existing; it is something called Mahayana Mind - Mind which is not to be found inside, outside, or in the middle. Truly it is not located anywhere. The first step is to refrain from knowledge-based concepts. This implies that if you were to follow the empirical method to the utmost limit, on reaching that limit you would still be unable to locate Mind. The way is spiritual Truth and was originally without name or title. It was only because people ignorantly sought for it empirically that the Buddhas appeared and taught them to eradicate this method of approach. Fearing that no one would understand, they selected the name 'Way.' You must not allow this name to lead you into a mental concept of a road. So it is said, 'When the fish is caught we pay no more attention to the trap.' When body and mind achieve spontaneity, the Way is reached and Mind is understood. A shramana is so called because he has penetrated to the original source of all things. The fruit of attaining the shramana stage is gained by putting an end to all anxiety; it does not come from book-learning.

Though others may talk of the Way of the Bhuddas as something to be reached by various pious practices and by sutra study, you must have nothing to do with such ideas. A perception, sudden as blinking, that subject and object are one, will lead to a deeply mysterious wordless understanding; and by this understanding will you awake to the truth of Zen. When you happen upon someone who has no understanding, you must claim to know nothing. He may he delighted by his discovery of some "way to Enlightenment"; yet if you allow yourselves to be persuaded by him, you will experience no delight at all, but suffer both sorrow and disappointment. What have such thoughts as his to do with the study of Zen? Even if you do obtain from him some trifling "method," it will only be a thought-constructed dharma having nothing to do with Zen. Thus, Bodhidharma sat rapt in meditation before a wall; he did not seek to lead people into having opinions. Therefore it is written: "To put out of the mind even the principle from which action springs is the true teaching of the Buddhas, while dualism belongs to the sphere of the demons." Your true nature is something never lost to you even in moments of delusion, nor is it gained at the moment of Enlightenment. It is the Nature of the Bhutatathata. In it is neither delusion nor right understanding. It fills the Void everywhere and is intrinsically of the substance of the One Mind. How, then, can your mind-created objects exist outside of the Void? The Void is fundamentally without spacial dimensions, passions, activities,delusions, or right understanding. You must clearly understand that in it there are no things, no men, no Buddhas; for this Void contains not the smallest hairsbreadth of anything that can be viewed spacially; it depends on nothing and is attached to nothing. It is all-pervading, spotless beauty;it is the self-existent and uncreated Absolute. Then how can it ever be a matter for discussion that the real Buddha has no mouth and preaches no dharma, or that real hearing requires no ears, for who could hear it? Ah,it is a jewel beyond all price!

The master said to me: All the Buddhas and all sentient beings are nothing but the One Mind, beside which nothing exists. This Mind, which is without beginning, is unborn and indestructible. It is not green nor yellow, and has neither form nor appearance. It does not belong to the categories of things which exist or do not exist, nor can it be thought of in terms of new or old. It is neither long nor short, big nor small, for it transcends all limits, measures, names, traces and comparisons. It is that which you see before you - begin to reason about it and you at once fall into error. It is like the boundless void which cannot be fathomed or measured. The One Mind alone is the Buddha, and there is no distinction between the Buddha and sentient things, but that sentient beings are attached to forms and so seek externally for Buddhahood. By their very seeking they lose it, for that is using the Buddha to seek for the Buddha and using mind to grasp Mind. Even though they do their utmost for a full aeon, they will not be able to attain it. They do not know that, if they put a stop to conceptual thought and forget their anxiety, the Buddha will appear before them, for this Mind is the Buddha and the Buddha is all living beings. It is not the less for being manifested in ordinary beings, nor is it greater for being manifested in the Buddhas.

Huang Po

Source: from "The Zen Teachings of Huang Po," ed John Blofeld.

Contributed by: Bjorn

A Quote by Huang Po on buddha-nature, buddhism, awareness, now, and mindfulness

Our original Buddha-nature is, in highest truth, devoid of any atom of objectivity. It is void, omnipresent, silent, pure; it is glorious and mysterious peaceful joy -- and that is all.

Enter into it by awaking to it yourself.

This which is before you is it, in all its fullness, utterly complete. There is naught else beside.

Huang Po

Source: The Zen Teachings of Huang Po

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Huang Po on foolish, wise, think, and perspective

“The foolish reject what they see, not what they think; the wise reject what they think, not what they see.”

Huang Po

Contributed by: Kyo

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