Herbert Spencer

1820 - 1903

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on knowledge, education, and action

The great aim of education is not knowledge, but action.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Contributed by: Alexandra

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on balance

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"Life is not for learning nor is life for working, but learning and working are for life."

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Contributed by: Andy

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on failure to learn

There is a principle that is a bar against all information and proof against all arguments, which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance.  That principle is contempt prior to investigation.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Contributed by: Kansas

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on time and trying

Time: That which man is always trying to kill, but which ends in killing him.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Source: Definitions

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on play and youth

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It was remarked to me by the late Mr. Charles Roupell . . . that to play billiards well was a sign of an ill-spent youth.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Source: Life and Letters of Spencer.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on animals, men, and relationships

The behaviour of men to the lower animals, and their behaviour to each other, bear a constant relationship.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on existence and society

Society exists for the benefit of its members, not the members for the benefit of society.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on existence, government, nature, and present

The Republican form of government is the highest form of government: but because of this it requires the highest type of human nature, a type nowhere at present existing.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on men and world

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The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Source: Essays

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Herbert Spencer on action, errors, life, men, politics, power, revolution, and superstition

Anyone who studies the state of things which preceded the French Revolution will see that the tremendous catastrophe came about from so excessive a regulation of men's actions in all their details, and such an enormous drafting away of the products of their actions to maintain the regulating organization, that life was fast becoming impracticable. And if we ask what then made, and now makes, this error possible, we find it to be the political superstition that governmental power is subject to no restraints.

Herbert Spencer (1820 - 1903)

Contributed by: Zaady

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