Henry Ward Beecher

1813 - 1887

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on good and humor

in

Good humor makes all things tolerable.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on anarchy, government, and world

The worst thing in the world next to anarchy, is government.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Source: Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit, 1867

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on evil

in

He thinketh no evil

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Source: (Green-Wood Cemetery; Brooklyn, New York)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher

A grindstone that had not grit in it, how long would it take to sharpen an axe? And affairs that had not grit in them how long would they take to make a man.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on civilization and leisure

There can be no high civilization where there is not ample leisure.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on expectation, pity, and responsibility

Hold yourself responsible for a higher standard than anyone else expects of you. Never excuse yourself. Never pity yourself. Be a hard taskmaster to yourself -- and be lenient with everybody else.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on principles

Expedients are for the hour; principles for the ages.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on belief, egotism, faults, men, and reflection

Men strengthen each other in their faults. Those who are alike associate together, repeat the things which all believe, defend and stimulate their common faults of disposition, and each one receives from the others a reflection of his own egotism.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Source: Eyes & Ears

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on flattery, praise, and purpose

Flattery is praise insincerely given for an interested purpose.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Source: Eyes and Ears

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on children, christ, day, death, influence, inventions, jesus, joy, life, men, and motherhood

You cannot find in the New Testament any of those hateful representations of dying which men have invented, by which death is portrayed as a ghastly skeleton with a scythe, or something equally revolting. The figures by which death is represented in the New Testament are very different. There are two of them which I think to be exquisitely beautiful. One is that of falling asleep in Jesus. When a little child has played all day long, and becomes tired out, and the twilight has sent it in weariness to its mother's knee, where it thinks it has come for more excitement, then, almost in the midst of its frolicking, and not knowing what influence is creeping over it, it falls back in the mother's arms, and nestles close to the sweetest and softest couch that ever cheek pressed, and, with lengthening breath, sleeps; and she smiles and is glad, and sits humming unheard joy over its head. So we fall asleep in Jesus. We have played long enough at the games of life, and at last we feel the approach of death. We are tired out, and we lay our head back on the bosom of Christ and quietly fall asleep.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

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