Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

1807 - 1882

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on good

in

Good-night! good-night! as we so oft have said, Beneath this roof at midnight, in the days That are no more, and shall no more return. Thou hast but taken up thy lamp and gone to bed; I stay a little longer, as one stays To cover up the embers that still burn.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on death

in

There is a reaper whose name is Death, And with his sickle keen He reaps the bearded grain at a breath, And the flowers that grow between.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Source: The Reaper and the Flowers.

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on death, life, and mortality

There is no death! What seems so is transition; This life of mortal breath Is but a suburb of the life elysian, Whose portal we call Death.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Source: Resignation.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on darkness, fate, heart, and life

Be still, sad heart and cease repining; Behind the clouds is the sun still shining; Thy fate is the common fate of all, Into each life some rain must fall, Some days must be dark and dreary.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on art and beginning

Great is the art of beginning, but greater is the art of ending.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on books, learning, love, and serenity

The love of learning, the sequestered nooks, And all the sweet serenity of books.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Source: Morituri Salutamus

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on assumptions and darkness

But oftentimes celestial benedictions Assume this dark disguise.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Source: Resignation.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on change

in

All things must change to something new, to something strange.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The lowest ebb is the turn of the tide.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on christmas, day, death, despair, earth, failure, familiarity, god, good, men, peace, play, sleep, songs, thought, words, and world

Christmas Bells I heard the bells on Christmas Day Their old, familiar carols play, And wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth, good-will to men! And thought how, as the day had come, The belfries of all Christendom Had rolled along The unbroken song Of peace on earth, good-will to men! Till, ringing, swinging on its way, The world revolved from night to day A voice, a chime, A chant sublime Of peace on earth, good-will to men! Then from each black, accursed mouth The cannon thundered in the South And with the sound The carols drowned Of peace on earth, good-will to men! It was as if an earthquake rent The hearth-stones of a continent, And made forlorn The households born Of peace on earth, good-will to men! And in despair I bowed my head; "There is no peace on earth," I said; "For hate is strong And mocks the song Of peace on earth, good-will to menl" Then pealed the bells more loud and deep, "God is not dead; nor cloth He sleep! The Wrong shall fail, The Right prevail, With peace on earth, good-will to menl"

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

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