Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

1807 - 1882

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on fear, future, improvement, past, and present

Look not mournfully into the past. It comes not back again. Wisely improve the present. It is thine. Go forth to meet the shadowy future, without fear.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on freedom and thought

Thought takes man out of servitude, into freedom.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on art, god, and nature

Nature is a revelation of God; Art a revelation of man.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on caring, duty, giving, men, and time

The everyday cares and duties, which men call drudgery, are the weights and counterpoises of the clock of time, giving its pendulum a true vibration and its hands a regular motion; and when they cease to hang upon its wheels, the pendulum no longer swings, the hands no longer move the clock stands still.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on fate, joy, sharing, trouble, and world

Trouble is the next best thing to enjoyment; there is no fate in the world so horrible as to have no share in either its joy or sorrows.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on heart, home, and rest

Stay, stay at home, my heart, and rest; Home-keeping hearts are happiest.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on death

in

There is a Reaper, whose name is Death, And with his sickle keen, He reaps the bearded grain at a breath, And the flowers that grow between.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on deed, needs, and thinking

Thinking the deed, and not the creed, Would help us in our utmost need.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on companions and men

The height of great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on life and world

in

Under the spreading chestnut tree The village smithy stands; The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands. . . . He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man. . . . Toiling,-rejoicing,-sorrowing, Onward through life he goes; Each morning sees some task begin, Each evening sees it close; Something attempted, something done, Has earned a night's repose.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Source: The Village Blacksmith

Contributed by: Zaady

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