Henry Fielding

1707 - 1754

A Quote by Henry Fielding on xanthippe and socrates

She was, besides, a profest follower of that noble sect founded by Xantippe of old; by means of which she became more formidable in the school than her husband; for, to confess the truth, he was never master there, or anywhere else, in her presence.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

Contributed by: Bob

A Quote by Henry Fielding

Illustrious predecessors.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Covent Garden Journal. Jan. 11, 1752.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding on animals and universe

There is not in the universe a more ridiculous, nor a more contemptible animal, than a proud clergyman.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Amelia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding

Republic of letters.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Tom Jones. Book xiv. Chap. i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding on eternity

Can any man have a higher notion of the rule of right and the eternal fitness of things?

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Tom Jones. Book iv. Chap. iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding on day and wedding

When widows exclaim loudly against second marriages, I would always lay a wager, that the man, if not the wedding-day, is absolutely fixed on.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Amelia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding on judgment

I am as sober as a judge.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Don Quixote in England. Act iii. Sc. 14.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding

This story will not go down.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Tumble-down Dick.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding on correction and love

There is perhaps no surer mark of folly, than to attempt to correct natural infirmities of those we love.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Source: Tom Jones

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Fielding on adversity, greatness, mind, prosperity, and soul

He that can heroically endure adversity will bear prosperity with equal greatness of the soul; for the mind that cannot be dejected by the former is not likely to be transported without the latter.

Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Contributed by: Zaady

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