Henry Ellis

1859 - 1939

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on civilization, revolution, and time

All civilization has from time to time become a thin crust over a volcano of revolution.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: Little Essays of Love and Virtue, 1922, ch. 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on country and virtue

There has never been any country at every moment so virtuous and so wise that it has not sometimes needed to be saved from itself.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Task of Social Hygiene, ch. 10

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on dance and life

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Dancing is the loftiest, the most moving, the most beautiful of the arts, because it is no mere translation or abstraction from life; it is life itself.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on family, idealism, life, and relationships

The family only represents one aspect, however important an aspect, of a human being's functions and activities. . . . A life is beautiful and ideal or the reverse, only when we have taken into our consideration the social as well as the family relationship.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: Little Essays of Love and Virtue, 1922, ch. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on architecture, art, beginning, dance, and lies

The art of dancing stands at the source of all the arts that express themselves first in the human person. The art of building, or architecture, is the beginning of all the arts that lie outside the person; and in the end they unite.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on art and autobiography

Every artist writes his own autobiography.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The New Spirit

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis

The byproduct is sometimes more valuable than the product.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: Little Essays of Love and Virtue, 1922, ch. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

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