Henry Ellis

1859 - 1939

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on living, letting go, and life

All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and holding on.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on goals and philosophy

In philosophy, it is not the attainment of the goal that matters, it is the things that are met with by the way.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis

The sun and the moon and the stars would have disappeared long ago . . . had they happened to be within the reach of predatory human hands.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on body, life, sex, and women

The omnipresent process of sex, as it is woven into the whole texture of our man's or woman's body, is the pattern of all the process of our life.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The New Spirit

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on progress

What we call "progress" is the exchange of one nuisance for another nuisance.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 6

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on lies and wilderness

The Promised Land always lies on the other side of a wilderness.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on faith

in

A sublime faith in human imbecility has seldom led those who cherish it astray.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: Selected Essays

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on kindness, money, poetry, and thinking

Thinking in its lower grades is comparable to paper money. and in its higher forms it is a kind of poetry.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on children, fiction, pleasure, and science

Even the most scientific investigator in science, the most thoroughgoing Positivist, cannot dispense with fiction; he must at least make use of categories, and they are already fictions, analogical fictions, or labels, which give us the same pleasure as children receive when they are told the "name" of a thing.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on optimism

The place where optimism most flourishes is the lunatic asylum.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content