Henry David Thoreau

1817 - 1862

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on dawn and day

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Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Source: Walden

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on good

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Be not simply good; be good for something.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on friendship and work

Be true to your work, your word, and your friend.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau

Being is the great explainer.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on belief and world

Live your beliefs and you can turn the world around.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on death, destruction, life, men, and understanding

Every creature is better alive than dead, men and moose and pine trees, and he who understands it aright will rather preserve its life than destroy it.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on facts, laws, nature, and needs

If we knew all the laws of Nature, we should need only fact, or the description of one actual phenomenon, to infer all the particular results at that point.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on men, thought, and world

How rarely I meet with a man who can be free, even in thought! We all live according to rule. Some men are bedridden; all world-ridden.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on time

in

The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait till that other is ready, and it may be a long time before they get off.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Source: Walden(1854),I,Economy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on anxiety, concern, day, labor, and mind

The true husbandman will cease from anxiety, as the squirrels manifest no concern whether the woods will bear chestnuts this year or not, and finish his labor with every day, relinquishing all claim to the produce of his fields, and sacrificing in his mind not only his first but last fruits also.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Source: Walden

Contributed by: Zaady

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