Henry Clay

1777 - 1852

A Quote by Henry Clay on sentimentality

The gentleman [Josiah Quincy] cannot have forgotten his own sentiment, uttered even on the floor of this House, "Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must."

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: Speech, 1813.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on oppression and people

An oppressed people are authorized whenever they can to rise and break their fetters.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: 1818, Speech in the House of Representatives

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on judgment and statistics

Statistics are no substitute for judgment.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on character, heart, life, and politics

In all the affairs of life, social as well as political, courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on presidency

I would rather be right than president.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on character and heart

Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on government, people, and trust

Government is a trust, and the officers of the government are trustees; and both the trust and the trustees are created for the benefit of the people.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: Speech at Ashland, Ky., March, 1829.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on character, honor, and men

Of all the properties which belong to honorable men, not one is so highly prized as that of character.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay

I have heard something said about allegiance to the South. I know no South, no North, no East, no West, to which I owe any allegiance.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: Speech, 1848.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on character, deed, nations, and people

A nation's character is the sum of its splendid deeds; they constitute one common patrimony, the nation's inheritance. They awe foreign powers, they arouse and animate our own people.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

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