Henry Clay

1777 - 1852

A Quote by Henry Clay on sentimentality

The gentleman [Josiah Quincy] cannot have forgotten his own sentiment, uttered even on the floor of this House, "Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must."

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: Speech, 1813.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on oppression and people

An oppressed people are authorized whenever they can to rise and break their fetters.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: 1818, Speech in the House of Representatives

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A Quote by Henry Clay on judgment and statistics

Statistics are no substitute for judgment.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

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A Quote by Henry Clay on character, heart, life, and politics

In all the affairs of life, social as well as political, courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

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A Quote by Henry Clay on character, deed, nations, and people

A nation's character is the sum of its splendid deeds; they constitute one common patrimony, the nation's inheritance. They awe foreign powers, they arouse and animate our own people.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

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A Quote by Henry Clay on control, day, fear, influence, men, and power

There is no power like oratory. Caesar controlled men by exciting their fears, Cicero by . . . swaying their passions. The influence of the one perished; that of the other continues to this day.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: Barnes & Noble Book of Quotations, by Robert I. Fitzhenry, 1987.

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A Quote by Henry Clay on presidency

Sir, I would rather be right than be President.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: Speech, 1850 (referring to the Compromise Measures).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on presidency

I would rather be right than president.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on character and heart

Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Clay on government, people, and trust

Government is a trust, and the officers of the government are trustees; and both the trust and the trustees are created for the benefit of the people.

Henry Clay (1777 - 1852)

Source: Speech at Ashland, Ky., March, 1829.

Contributed by: Zaady

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