Henry Adams

1838 - 1918

A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on facts, politics, and practicality

Practical politics consists of ignoring facts.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

Source: The Education of Henry Adams, 1907

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on friendship, losing, and power

A friend in power is a friend lost.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on devil, sleep, and strength

If I grapple with sin in my own strength, the devil knows he may go to sleep.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on eternity, influence, and teachers

A teacher affects eternity. He can never tell where his influence stops.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

Source: The Education of Henry Adams

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on women

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Women have, commonly, a very positive moral sense; that which they will, is right; that which they reject, is wrong; and their will, in most cases, ends by settling the moral.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on learning

They know enough who know how to learn.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on intelligence

There is no such thing as an underestimate of average intelligence.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on thought and words

No man means all he says, and yet very few say all they mean, for words are slippery and thought is viscous.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

Source: "The Education of Henry Adams", 1907

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams

Everyone carries his own inch rule of taste, and amuse himself by applying it, triumphantly, wherever he travels.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

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A Quote by Henry Brooks Adams on day, expectation, friendship, good, intention, men, newspapers, patience, respect, spirit, and tact

Had Grant been a Congressman one would have been on one's guard, for one knew the type. One never expected from a Congressman more than good intentions and public spirit. Newspaper-men as a rule had no great respect for the lower House; Senators had less; and Cabinet officers had none at all. Indeed, one day when Adams was pleading with a Cabinet officer for patience and tact in dealing with Representatives, the Secretary impatiently broke out: "You can't use tact with a Congressman! A Congressman is a hog! You must take a stick and hit him on the snout!" The secretary who made the remark "may well have been Adams's friend, Secretary of the Interior Jacob Dolson Cox," according to note 18 on p. 617.

Henry Adams (1838 - 1918)

Source: The Education of Henry Adams, ed. Ernest Samuels, chapter 17, p. 261 (1973). Originally published in 1906.

Contributed by: Zaady

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