Henepola Gunaratana

A Quote by Henepola Gunaratana on morality and behavior

"[M]orality is not a ritualistic obedience to a code of behavior imposed by an external authority.  It is rather a healthy habit pattern that you have consciously and voluntarily chosen to impose upon yourself because you recognize its superiority to your present behavior."

Henepola Gunaratana

Source: Mindfulness in Plain English, Updated and Expanded Edition

Contributed by: StellaByStarlight

A Quote by Henepola Gunaratana on buddhism, mindfulness, patience, and self-discipline

"Discipline" is a difficult word for most of us. It conjures up images of somebody standing over you with a stick, telling you that you're wrong. But self-discipline is different. It's the skill of seeing through the hollow shouting of your own impulses and piercing their secret. They have no power over you. It's all a show, a deception. Your urges scream and bluster at you; they cajole; they coax; they threaten; but they really carry no stick at all. You give in out of habit. You give in because you never really bother to look beyond the threat. It is all empty back there. There is only one way to learn this lesson, though. The words on this page won't do it. But look within and watch the stuff coming up-restlessness, anxiety, impatience, pain-just watch it come up and don't get involved. Much to your surprise, it will simply go away. It rises, it passes away. As simple as that. There is another word for self-discipline. It is patience.

Henepola Gunaratana

Source: Mindfulness in Plain English, Updated and Expanded Edition

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Henepola Gunaratana on self-deception, defence mechanisms, buddhism, awareness, acceptance, and denial

One popular human strategy for dealing with difficulty is autosuggestion: when something nasty pops up, you convince yourself it is not there, or you convince yourself it is pleasant rather than unpleasant. The Buddha's tactic is quite the reverse. Rather than hide it or disguise it, the Buddha's teaching urges you to examine it to death. Buddhism advises you not to implant feelings that you don't really have or avoid feelings that you do have. If you are miserable you are miserable; that is the reality, that is what is happening, so confront that.  Look it square in the eye without flinching. When you are having a bad time, examine that experience, observe it mindfully, study the phenomenon and learn its mechanics. The way out of a trap is to study the trap itself, learn how it is built. You do this by taking the thing apart piece by piece. The trap can't trap you if it has been taken to pieces. The result is freedom.

Henepola Gunaratana

Source: Mindfulness in Plain English, Updated and Expanded Edition, Pages: 98

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Henepola Gunaratana on clarity, perception, and reality

Vipassana: looking into something with clarity and precision, seeing each component as distinct, piercing all the way through so as to perceive the most fundamental reality of that thing.

Henepola Gunaratana

Contributed by: Zaady

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