Helen Rowland

1876 - 1950

A Quote by Helen Rowland on wives

in

One man's folly is another man's wife.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on grace, praise, sage, and youth

Call the bald man, "Boy;" make the sage thy toy; greet the youth with solemn face; praise the fat man for his grace.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on commitment, life, opportunity, and regret

The follies which a man regrets the most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on love

in

Soft, sweet things with a lot of fancy dressing - that's what a little boy loves to eat and a grown man prefers to marry.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on husbands, marriage, wives, and women

After marriage, a woman's sight becomes so keen that she can see right through her husband without looking at him, and a man's so dull that he can look right through his wife without seeing her.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on life, marriage, and newspapers

Before marriage, a man will lay down his life for you; after marriage he won't even lay down his newspaper.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on practice and sacrifice

In olden times sacrifices were made at the altar - a practice which is still continued.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on marriage

Marriage is like twirling a baton, turning hand springs or eating with chopsticks. It looks easy until you try it.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on bachelors

Marrying an old bachelor is like buying second-hand furniture.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Helen Rowland on action, conscience, love, sentimentality, and wine

What a man calls his "conscience" is merely the mental action that follows a sentimental reaction after too much wine or love.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

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