H. G. Dwight

A Quote by H. G. Dwight on certainty, day, memory, and miracles

Certain miracles that I beheld there have haunted my memory ever since: a gray April morning of sirocco, when the almond blossoms, the flaming tulips, the young green of the vines, hung as if painted on the motionless air; a summer night when the roses had an unearthly pallor under a half-eaten moon, whose ghostliness was somehow one with their perfume and with the phosphorescence of dew tipping their petals; a day when the trees stood part submerged in fog, into which leaves dropped slowly, slowly, one after another, and sank out of sight.

H. G. Dwight

Source: Gardens and Gardening, Atlantic Monthly, 1912

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by H. G. Dwight on garden, imagination, and literature

Is it too ingenuous to imagine that anything can be left to say about a garden? Garden literature, descriptive, reminiscent, and technical, has blossomed so profusely among us during the last decade, that he should be an expert indeed who ventures to add thereto.

H. G. Dwight

Source: Gardens and Gardening, Atlantic Monthly, 1912

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by H. G. Dwight on birds, impossibility, life, men, sentimentality, and yielding

And there were times when one yielded quite shamelessly to the sentimental. They were more likely to be times of crickets, I think, than of birds - when it was impossible not to feel, like another essence of the sunlight, the bittersweet of life that lingers about old houses, and places where men have died, and things that forgotten hands have touched.

H. G. Dwight

Source: Gardens and Gardening, Atlantic Monthly, 1912

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by H. G. Dwight on garden and honor

As for vegetables, I do not consider a plot of ground devoted to them worthy of the honorable name of garden. Vegetables are, of course, a part of gardening, but the least, the last, for those who do not have to raise them, the most dishonorable part.

H. G. Dwight

Source: Gardens and Gardening, Atlantic Monthly, 1912

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by H. G. Dwight on art, colors, garden, god, and opportunity

A small garden, accordingly, gives its owner a far greater opportunity to express himself . . . in a garden any man may be an artist, may experiment with all the subtleties or simplicities of line, mass, color, and composition, and taste the god-like joys of the creator.

H. G. Dwight

Source: Gardens and Gardening, Atlantic Monthly, 1912

Contributed by: Zaady

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