Godfrey H. Hardy

1877 - 1947

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy

It is not worth an intelligent man's time to be in the majority. By definition, there are already enough people to do that.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Contributed by: The Grand Abbot

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on books and men

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Young Men should prove theorems, old men should write books.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: Quoted by Freeman Dyson in Freeman Dyson: Mathematician, Physicist, and Writer. Interview with Donald J. Albers, The College Mathematics Journal, vol. 25, No. 1, January 1994.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on art, creativity, and mathematics

I am interested in mathematics only as a creative art.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press, 1941.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on belief, lies, observation, and reality

I believe that mathematical reality lies outside us, that our function is to discover or observe it, and that the theorems which we prove, and which we describe grandiloquently as our "creations," are simply the notes of our observations.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press, 1941.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on chess, love, play, sacrifice, and weapons

Reductio ad absurdum, which Euclid loved so much, is one of a mathematician's finest weapons. It is a far finer gambit than any chess play: a chess player may offer the sacrifice of a pawn or even a piece, but a mathematician offers the game.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press, 1941.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on economics and mathematics

In great mathematics there is a very high degree of unexpectedness, combined with inevitability and economy.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press, 1941.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on beauty, colors, ideas, mathematics, poets, ugliness, words, and world

The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas, like the colors or the words must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in this world for ugly mathematics.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press, 1941.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on chance, death, ideas, and immortality

Archimedes will be remembered when Aeschylus is forgotten, because languages die and mathematical ideas do not. "Immortality" may be a silly word, but probably a mathematician has the best chance of whatever it may mean.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press,1941.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on lies

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On Ramanujan: I remember once going to see him when he was lying ill at Putney. I had ridden in taxi cab number 1729 and remarked that the number seemed to me rather a dull one, and that I hoped it was not an unfavorable omen. "No," he replied, "it is a very interesting number; it is the smallest number expressible as the sum of two cubes in two different ways."

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: Ramanujan, London: Cambridge Univesity Press, 1940.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on destruction, existence, life, science, and wealth

A science is said to be useful if its development tends to accentuate the existing inequalities in the distribution of wealth, or more directly promotes the destruction of human life.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press, 1941.

Contributed by: Zaady

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