George Washington

1732 - 1799

A Quote by George Washington on confidence

Be courteous to all, but intimate with few; and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Washington on army, discipline, soul, success, and weakness

Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable, procures success to the weak, and esteem to all.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Washington on execution, feeling, and government

I go to the chair of government with feelings not unlike those of a culprit who is going to the place of his execution.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Washington on eternity, expectation, heaven, nations, order, persuasion, and rules

WE OUGHT TO BE PERSUADED THAT THE PROPITIOUS SMILES OF HEAVEN CAN NEVER BE EXPECTED ON A NATION THAT DISREGARDS THE ETERNAL RULES OF ORDER AND RIGHT WHICH HEAVEN ITSELF HAS ORDAINED.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Source: ALBERT W. DAW COLLECTION

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A Quote by George Washington on peace and war

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One of his officers, Henry Lee, summed up contemporary public opinion of Washington: First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Washington on acting, character, circumstances, death, decisions, doubt, fatherhood, fortune, good, imagination, integrity, inventions, judgment, justice, mind, nature, obstacles, prudence, purity, purpose, and words

Written about Washington after his death by another of the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson: His mind was great and powerful . . . as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion. . . . Perhaps the strongest feature in his character was prudence, never acting until every circumstance, every consideration, was maturely weighed; refraining if he saw doubt, but, when once decided, going through his purpose, whatever obstacles opposed. His integrity was the most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known. . . . He was, indeed, in every sense of the words, a wise, a good and a great man . . . On the whole, his character was, in its mass, perfect . . . it may truly be said, that never did nature and fortune combine more perfectly to make a man great. . . .

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: Zaady

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