George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on beginning and life

The beginning of compunction is the beginning of a new life.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Felix Holt, the Radical, ch. 13, 1866.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on anger, babies, beauty, beginning, intelligence, justice, men, mind, order, and women

There are various orders of beauty, causing men to make fools of themselves in various styles. . . but there is one order of beauty which seems made to turn the heads not only of men, but of all intelligent mammals, even of women. It is a beauty like that of kittens, or very small downy ducks making gentle rippling noises with their soft bills, or babies just beginning to toddle and to engage in conscious mischief - a beauty with which you can never be angry, but that you feel ready to crush for inability to comprehend the state of mind into which it throws you.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on discontent, love, satisfaction, and self-love

It is possible to have a strong self-love without any self-satisfaction, rather with a self-discontent which is the more intense because one's own little core of egoistic sensibility is a supreme care.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda, bk. 1, ch. 2, 1876.

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A Quote by George Eliot on men and mind

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To manage men, one ought to have a sharp mind in a velvet sheath.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on abstinence, facts, and giving

Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordy evidence of the fact.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Impressions of Theophratus Such

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on delusion, silence, and speech

Speech is often barren; but silence also does not necessarily brood over a full nest. Your still fowl, blinking at you without remark, may all the while be sitting on one addled egg; and when it takes to cackling will have nothing to announce but that addled delusion.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Felix Holt, ch. 15, 1866.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on defeat

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There are many victories worse than a defeat.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on vision

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Strange, that some of us, with quick alternate vision, see beyond our infatuations, and even while we rave on the heights, behold the wide plain where our persistent self pauses and awaits us.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 2, ch. 15 (1871-72).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on evil and good

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One soweth and another reapeth is a verity that applies to evil as well as good.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on argument and words

You have such strong words at command, that they make the smallest argument seem formidable.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Esther to Felix, in Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 5, 1866.

Contributed by: Zaady

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