George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on belief, satisfaction, sincerity, and theory

The egoism which enters into our theories does not affect their sincerity; rather, the more our egoism is satisfied, the more robust is our belief.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 5, ch. 53, 1871.

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A Quote by George Eliot on failure, fear, proof, and purpose

I'm proof against that word failure. I've seen behind it. The only failure a man ought to fear is failure of cleaving to the purpose he sees to be best.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on feeling and security

To have in general but little feeling, seems to be the only security against feeling too much on any particular occasion.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 1, ch. 7, 1871.

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A Quote by George Eliot on faults

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There is nothing that will kill a man so soon as having nobody to find fault with but himself.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on communication, people, reflection, and sympathy

Sympathetic people often don't communicate well, they back reflected images which hide their own depths.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on world

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This is a puzzling world, and Old Harry's got a finger in it.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Mr. Tulliver, in The Mill on the Floss, bk. 3, ch. 9 (1860). "Old Harry" was the Devil.

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A Quote by George Eliot on misery and world

It is seldom that the miserable of the world can help regarding their misery as a wrong inflicted by those who are less miserable.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on education and trust

Those who trust us educate us.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot

It is never too late to be what you might have been.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on success and world

The best augury of a man's success in his profession is that he thinks it the finest in the world.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: The Rector, in Daniel Deronda, bk. 8, ch. 58 (1876).

Contributed by: Zaady

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