George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on people

in

People who can't be witty exert themselves to be devout and affectionate.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on bachelors, home, husbands, and women

I should like to know what is the proper function of women, if it is not to make reasons for husbands to stay at home, and still stronger reasons for bachelors to go out.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: The Mill on the Floss

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A Quote by George Eliot on history, nations, and women

The happiest women, like the happiest nations, have no history.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: The Mill on the Floss

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A Quote by George Eliot on happiness, heart, and women

A woman's heart must be of such a size and no larger, else it must be pressed small, like Chinese feet; her happiness is to be made as cakes are, by a fixed receipt.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Deronda's mother, in Daniel Deronda, bk. 7, ch. 51 (1876), on society's expectations of women.

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A Quote by George Eliot on hope and women

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A woman's hopes are woven of sunbeams; a shadow annihilates them.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Felix Holt

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A Quote by George Eliot

A maggot must be born i' the rotten cheese to like it.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Adam Bede

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A Quote by George Eliot on laughter and wisdom

In the vain laughter of folly wisdom hears half its applause.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Romola, bk. 1, ch. 12, 1863.

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A Quote by George Eliot on certainty and deed

No great deed is done by falterers who ask for certainty.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on people

in

We want people to feel with us more than to act for us.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: George Eliot's Life as Related in Her Letters & Journals, 1884

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A Quote by George Eliot on beginning, books, listening, and love

Most of us who turn to any subject we love remember some morning or evening hour when we got on a high stool to reach down an untried volume, or sat with parted lips listening to a new talker, or for very lack of books began to listen to voices within. . . .

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 2, ch. 15, 1871.

Contributed by: Zaady

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