George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on day and thought

Each thought is a nail that is driven In structures that cannot decay; And the mansion at last will be given To us as we build it each day.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on change and life

Life is measured by the rapidity of change, the succession of influences that modify the being.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Felix Holt, The Radical,

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A Quote by George Eliot on abstinence

Abstinence is whereby a man refraineth from anything which he may lawfully claim.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on action

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Human beings must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on deed

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Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Adam Bede

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A Quote by George Eliot on world

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It's them as take advantage that get advantage i' this world.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Mrs. Poyser, in Adam Bede, bk. 4, ch. 32 (1859).

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A Quote by George Eliot on faith, friendship, and mind

What a wretched lot of old shriveled creatures we shall be by-and-by. Never mind - the uglier we get in the eyes of others, the lovelier we shall be to each other; that has always been my firm faith about friendship.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Letter, 27 May 1852.

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A Quote by George Eliot on good

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An ass may bray a good while before he shakes the stars down.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Romola, ch. 50 (1863).

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A Quote by George Eliot on anger, jealousy, and love

Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: The Mill on the Floss, bk. 1, ch. 10, 1860.

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A Quote by George Eliot on animals, friendship, and questions

Animals are such agreeable friends - they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Mr. Gilfil’s Love-Story

Contributed by: Zaady

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