George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on life and trouble

Boots and shoes are the greatest trouble of my life. Everything else one can turn and turn about, and make old look like new; but there's no coaxing boots and shoes to look better than they are.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Uncommon Scold, by Abby Adams, 1989.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot

Breed is stronger than pasture.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on abstinence

Abstinence is whereby a man refraineth from anything which he may lawfully claim.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on action

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Human beings must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on deed

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Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Adam Bede

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A Quote by George Eliot on world

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It's them as take advantage that get advantage i' this world.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Mrs. Poyser, in Adam Bede, bk. 4, ch. 32 (1859).

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A Quote by George Eliot on faith, friendship, and mind

What a wretched lot of old shriveled creatures we shall be by-and-by. Never mind - the uglier we get in the eyes of others, the lovelier we shall be to each other; that has always been my firm faith about friendship.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Letter, 27 May 1852.

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A Quote by George Eliot on good

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An ass may bray a good while before he shakes the stars down.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Romola, ch. 50 (1863).

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A Quote by George Eliot on anger, jealousy, and love

Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: The Mill on the Floss, bk. 1, ch. 10, 1860.

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A Quote by George Eliot on animals, friendship, and questions

Animals are such agreeable friends - they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Mr. Gilfil’s Love-Story

Contributed by: Zaady

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