George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on death and immortality

Oh may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Poems: Oh may I join the choir invisible

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on music and world

So shall I join the choir invisible Whose music is the gladness of the world.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Poems: Oh may I join the choir invisible

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot

Breed is stronger than pasture.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on day and thought

Each thought is a nail that is driven In structures that cannot decay; And the mansion at last will be given To us as we build it each day.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on change and life

Life is measured by the rapidity of change, the succession of influences that modify the being.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Felix Holt, The Radical,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on time

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No story is the same to us after a lapse of time; or rather we who read it are no longer the same interpreters.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on aphorisms, character, and destiny

'Character," says Novalis, in one of his questionable aphorisms - character is destiny'.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: The Mill on the Floss

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on character, confidence, and friendship

For character too is a process and an unfolding. . . among our valued friends is there not someone or other who is a little too self confident and disdainful. . . .

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 2, ch. 15, 1871.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on belief and children

Children demand that their heroes should be fleckless, and easily believe them so . . .

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda, bk. 2, ch. 16, 1876.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on belief, misery, and seriousness

There is hardly any mental misery worse than that of having our own serious phrases, our own rooted beliefs, caricatured by a charlatan or a hireling.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 11 (1866).

Contributed by: Zaady

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