George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on influence and soul

Blessed is the influence of one true, loving human soul on another.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on friendship and memory

How unspeakably the lengthening of memories in common endears our old friends!

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on gratitude

Friendships begin with liking or gratitude - roots that can be pulled up.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda

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A Quote by George Eliot on desires, future, and past

I desire no future that will break the ties with the past.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on literature

Excessive literary production is a social offense.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on good

in

Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Silas Marner, 1861

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A Quote by George Eliot on motives and women

expectations of women Every woman is supposed to have the same set of motives, or else to be a monster.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Deronda's mother, in Daniel Deronda, bk.7, ch.51 (1876).

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A Quote by George Eliot on ability, experience, maxims, practicality, and quotations

In spite of his practical ability, some of his experience had petrified into maxims and quotations.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda, bk. 2, ch. 15 (1874 --76), of the Rector (Gwendolen Harleth's uncle).

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A Quote by George Eliot on failure, good, and perseverance

Failure after long perseverance is much grander than never to have a striving good enough to be called a failure.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Letter, 11 September 1871.

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A Quote by George Eliot on appreciation, careers, purpose, and starting

He was at a starting point which makes many a man's career a fine subject for betting, if there were any gentlemen given to that amusement who could appreciate the complicated probabilities of an arduous purpose. . . .

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 2, ch. 15 (1871), said of Lydgate, the new doctor in town.

Contributed by: Zaady

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