George Eliot

1819 - 1880

A Quote by George Eliot on anger, cruelty, direction, and kindness

Ignorant kindness may have the effect of cruelty; but to be angry with it as if it were direct cruelty would be an ignorant unkindness.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda, bk. 8, ch. 59 (1876).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on hatred

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Hatred is like fire; it makes even light rubbish deadly.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on lies, truth, arrogance, scorn, and smell

The scornful nostril and the high head gather not the odors that lie on the track of truth.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Felix Holt, the Radical

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A Quote by George Eliot on hell

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Hell is oneself; Hell is alone, the other figures in it merely projections. There is nothing to escape from and nothing to escape to. One is always alone.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Edward, in The Cocktail Party, act 1, sc. 3.

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A Quote by George Eliot on despair, hope, and pain

What we call despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot

Hostesses who entertain much must make up their parties as ministers make up their cabinets, on grounds other than personal liking.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda, bk. 1, ch. 5 (1874-76).

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A Quote by George Eliot on belief

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Human beliefs, like all other natural growths, elude the barrier of systems.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on humor and rules

He who rules must humor full as much as he commands.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on circumstances

It always remains true that if we had been greater, circumstance would have been less strong against us.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 6, ch. 58 (1871).

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A Quote by George Eliot on ignorance

Ignorance gives one a large range of probabilities.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda, 1874

Contributed by: Zaady

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