George Crabbe

1754 - 1832

A Quote by George Crabbe on good and luxury

He tried the luxury of doing good.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: Tales. Tales of the Hall. Book iii. Boys at School.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on health, heart, joy, manners, and youth

Her air, her manners, all who saw admir'd; Courteous though coy, and gentle though retir'd; The joy of youth and health her eyes display'd, And ease of heart her every look convey'd.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: The Parish Register. Part ii. Marriages.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe

Cut and come again.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: Tales. Tale vii. The Widow's Tale.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on darkness and love

Oh, rather give me commentators plain, Who with no deep researches vex the brain; Who from the dark and doubtful love to run, And hold their glimmering tapers to the sun.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: The Parish Register. Part i. Introduction.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on paradise

In this fool's paradise he drank delight.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: The Borough. Letter xii. Players.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on good

in

Good is done by degrees.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on love

in

Better to love amiss than nothing to have loved.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: Tales. Tale xiv. The Struggles of Conscience.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on immortality and lies

Hence, in these times, untouch'd the pages lie, And slumber out their immortality.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: The Library

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on books, life, people, selfishness, sorrow, and yielding

This, books can do-nor this alone; they give New views to life, and teach us how to live; They soothe the grieved, the stubborn they chastise; Fools they admonish, and confirm the wise. Their aid they yield to all: they never shun The man of sorrow, nor the wretch undone; Unlike the hard, the selfish, and the proud, They fly not sullen from the suppliant crowd; Nor tell to various people various things, But show to subjects, what they show to kings.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: The Library

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on books, food, and good

Books cannot always please, however good; Minds are not ever craving for their food.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: The Borough. Letter xxiv. Schools.

Contributed by: Zaady

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