Gaston Bachelard

1884 - 1962

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on dream, words, reading, page, meaning, and youth

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the word begin to move around. Stressed accents begin to invert. The word abandons its meaning like an overload which is too heavy and prevents dreaming. Then words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, word, dream, writing, pen, and page

Doesn't reverie ramify the sentence which has been begun? A word is a bud attempting to become a twig. How can one not dream while writing? It is the pen which dreams. The blank page gives the right to dream. If only one could write for himself alone.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on words, reverie, past, and time

Words, in their distant past, have the past of my reveries.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reality, simplicity, and perspective

Of course, any simplification runs the risk of mutilating reality; but it helps us establish perspectives.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 19

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on memory, childhood, image, dream, and reverie

If there is any realm where distinction is especially difficult, it is the realm of childhood memories, the realm of beloved images harbored in memory since childhood. These memories which live by the image and in virtue of the image become, at certain times of our lives and particularly during the quiet age, the origin and matter of a complex reverie: the memory dreams, and reverie remembers.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 20

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reality, reverie, and psyche

The demands of our reality function require that we adapt to reality, that we constitute ourselves as a reality and that we manufacture works which are realities. But doesn't reverie, by its very essence, liberate us from the reality function? From the moment it is considered in all its simplicity, it is perfectly evident that reverie bears witness to a normal useful irreality function which keeps the human psyche on the fringe of all the brutality of a hostile and foreign non-self.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 13

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on imagination, reverie, and being

Through imagination, thanks to the subtleties of the irreality function, we re-enter the world of confidence, the world of the confident being, which is the proper world for reverie.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 14

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on solitude, dream, and memory

A pretext--not a cause--is sufficient for us to enter the "solitary situation", the situation of the dreaming solitude. In this solitude, memories arrange themselves in tableaux. Decor takes precedence over drama. Sad memories take on at least the peace of melancholy.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 14

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on dream, passion, life, night, and solitude

The dream remains overloaded with the badly lived passions of daytime life. Solitude in the nocturnal dream is always a hostility. It is strange. It isn't really our solitude.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 14

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on dream

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Very often, I confess, the teller of dreams bores me. His dream could perhaps interest me if it were frankly worked on. But to hear a glorious tale of his insanity! I have not yet clarified, psychoanalytically, this boredom during the recital of other people's dreams. Perhaps I have retained the stiffness of a rationalist. I do not follow the tale of justified incoherence docilely. I always suspect that part of the stupidities being recounted are invented.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 11

Contributed by: Chris

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