Gaston Bachelard

1884 - 1962

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, dream, and anima

Here we are at the very core of the thesis we wish to defend in the present essay: reverie is under the sign of the anima. When the reverie is truly profound, the being who comes to dream within us is our anima. For a philosopher who takes his inspiration from phenomenology, a reverie on reverie is very exactly a phenomenology of the anima, and it is by coordinating reveries on reverie that he hopes to constitute a "Poetics of reverie". In other words, the poetics of reverie is a poetics of the anima.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 62

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, image, and happiness

The reverie would not last if it were not nourished by the images of the sweetness of living, by the illusions of happiness.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 64

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie and soul

Reverie is not a mind vacuum. It is rather the gift of an hour which knows the plenitude of the soul.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 64

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on concept, image, imagination, and stability

Perhaps it is even a good idea to stir up a rivalry between conceptual and imaginative activity. In any case, one will encounter nothing but disappointments if he intends to make them cooperate. The image can not provide matter for a concept. By giving stability to the image, the concept would stifle its life.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 52

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on concept, image, science, knowledge, and abstraction

In scientific thought, the concept functions all the better for being cut off from all background images. In its full exercise, the scientific concept is free from all the delays of its genetic evolution, an evolution which is consequently explained by simple psychology. The virility of knowledge increases with each conquest of the constructive abstraction.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 52

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on image, reverie, imagination, and objectivity

The image can only be studied through the image, by dreaming images as they gather in reverie. It is a non-sense to claim to study imagination objectively since one really receives the image only if he admires it. Already in comparing one image to another, one runs the risk of losing participation in its individuality.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 53

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on conscience, work, and life

A clear conscience is, for me, an occupied conscience--never empty--the conscience of a man at work until his last breath.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 53..54

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on words, dreams, and poetry

By listening to certain words as a child listens to the sea in a seashell, a word dreamer hears the murmur of a world of dreams.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 49

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on writing, childhood, and dream

In order to dream so far, is it enough to read? Isn't it necessary to write? Write as in our schoolboy past, in those days when, as Bonnoure says, the letters wrote themselves one by one, either in their gibbosity or else in their pretentious elegance? In those days, spelling was a drama, our drama of culture at work in the interior of a word.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 50

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on object, force, industry, and individual

In our life as a civilized person in the industrial age, we are invaded by objects; how could an object have a "force" when it no longer has individuality?

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 36

Contributed by: Chris

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