Gandhi

1869 - 1948

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on purification, self-purification, passion, passions, love, hatred, attachment, and repulsion

[The] path of self-purification is hard and steep. [One] has to become absolutely passion-free in thought, speech and action to rise above the opposing currents of love and hatred, attachment and repulsion. I know that I have not in me as yet that triple purity in spite of constant ceaseless striving for it. That is why the world's praise fails to move me, indeed it very often stings me. To conquer the subtle passions seems to me to be harder far than the physical conquest of the world by the force of arms.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Source: The Essential Gandhi: An Anthology of His Writings on His Life, Work, and Ideas (Vintage Spiritual Classics), Pages: 62

Contributed by: jess

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on compassion

There are people in the world so hungry that GOD cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Source: m.t.g. Quotation Collatio Vol. I

Contributed by: Your Fantasy

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on service, joy, pleasure, and possessions

Service which is rendered without joy helps neither the servant nor the served. But all other pleasures and possessions pale into nothingness before service which is rendered in a spirit of joy.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Source: The Essential Gandhi: An Anthology of His Writings on His Life, Work, and Ideas (Vintage Spiritual Classics), Pages: 42

Contributed by: jess

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on possession, non-possession, aparigraha, and ownership

One after another, then by almost geometric progression, things slipped away from me. [A] great burden fell off my shoulders, and I felt that I could not walk with ease and do my work also in the service of my fellow men with great comfort and still greater joy. The possession of anything then became a troublesome thing and a burden. Exploring the cause of that joy, I found that if I kept anything as my own, I had to defend it against the whole world.... And I said to myself: if [other people] want it and would take it, they do so not from any malicious motive but... because thers was a greater need than mine. And I said to myself: possession seems to me to be a crime, I can only possess certain things when I know that others who also want to possess similar things are able to do so. But we know.... such a thing is an impossibility. Therefore, the only thing that can be possessed by all is non-possession, not to have anything whatsoever. Or... a willing surrender....

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Source: The Essential Gandhi: An Anthology of His Writings on His Life, Work, and Ideas (Vintage Spiritual Classics)

Contributed by: jess

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on happiness

Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in Harmony

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Haz

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on service, doubt, poverty, weakness, and freedom

I will give you a talisman. Whenever you are in doubt, or when the self becomes too much with you, apply the following test. Recall the face of the poorest and the weakest man whom you may have seen, and ask yourself, if the step you contemplate is going to be of any use to him. Will he gain anything by it? Will it restore him to a control over his own life and destiny? In other words, will it lead to swaraj [freedom] for the hungry and spiritually starving millions?

Then you will find your doubts and your self melt away.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: m

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on god

in

If you don't find God in the next person you meet, it is a waste of time looking for Him further.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Ameya

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on victory and defeat

What kind of victory is it when someone is left defeated?

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Ameya

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on ahimsa, non-violence, and gandhi

Non-violence is not a cover for cowardice, but it is the supreme virtue of the brave. Exercise of non-violence requires far greater bravery than that of swordsmanship. Cowardice is wholly inconsistent with non-violence. Translation from swordsmanship to non-violence is possible and, at times, even an easy stage. Non-violence, therefore, presupposes ability to strike. It is a conscious deliberate restraint put upon one's desire for vengeance. But vengeance is any day superior to passive, effeminate and helpless submission. Forgiveness is higher still. Vengeance too is weakness. The desire for vengeance comes out of fear of harm, imaginary or real. A dog barks and bites when he fears. A man who fears no one on earth would consider it too troublesome even to summon up anger against one who is vainly trying to injure him. The sun does not wreak vengeance upon little children who throw dust at him. They only harm themselves in the act.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Source: (YI, 12-8-1926, p285)

Contributed by: Cris

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