Frederic William Farrar

1831 - 1903

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on acceptance, animals, belief, birth, church, familiarity, history, jesus, life, time, and traditions

Canon Farrar accepts the traditional belief that the shelter within which Jesus was born was that of one of the numerous limestone caves which abound in the region, and which are still used by travelers as resting places. He says: "In Palestine it not infrequently happens that the entire khan, or at any rate the portion of it in which the animals are housed, is one of those innumerable caves which abound in the limestone rocks of its central hills. Such seems to have been in the case at the little town of Bethlehem-Ephratah, in the land of Judah. Justin Martyr, the Apologist, who, from his birth at Shechem, was familiar with Palestine, and who lived less than a century after the time of our Lord, places the scene of the nativity in a cave. This is, indeed, the ancient and constant tradition both of the Eastern and the Western Churches, and it is one of the few to which, though unrecorded in the Gospel history, we may attach a reasonable probability."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, chapter 1, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.8, p.106

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on women

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The address 'Woman' was so respectful that it might be, and was, addressed to the queenliest.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.134, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, p.136 footnote

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on difficulty, god, heart, love, obedience, purity, rules, slavery, soul, spirit, spirituality, strength, elightenment, and yielding

It is easy to be a slave to the letter, and difficult to enter into the spirit; easy to obey a number of outward rules, difficult to enter intelligently and self-sacrificingly into the will of God; easy to entangle the soul in a network of petty observances, difficult to yield the obedience of an enlightened heart; easy to be haughtily exclusive, difficult to be humbly spiritual; easy to be an ascetic or a formalist, difficult to be pure, and loving, and wise, and free; easy to be a Pharisee, difficult to be a disciple; very easy to embrace a self-satisfying and sanctimonious system of rabbinical observances, very difficult to love God with all the heart, and all the might, and all the soul, and all the strength.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, quoted by Dallin H. Oaks, Pure in Heart, p.25

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on cities, destruction, dogs, earth, food, god, murder, pollution, sacred, and worship

Speaking of the murder of the younger Hanan, and other eminent nobles and hierarchs, Josephus says, "I cannot but think that it was because God had doomed this city to destruction as a polluted city, and was resolved to purge His sanctuary by fire, that He cut off these their great defenders and well-wishers; while those that a little before had worn the sacred garments and presided over the public worship, and had been esteemed venerable by those that dwelt in the whole habitable earth, were cast out naked, and seen to be the food of dogs and wild beasts."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: The Life of Christ, pp. 572-73, quoted by Bruce R. McConkie, The Mortal Messiah, Vol.3, p.434-435, Footnote

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on age, beginning, belief, children, christ, christianity, cities, death, dogs, earth, enemies, experience, fighting, friendship, generations, god, gold, history, hunger, kindness, lies, men, motherhood, people, prophet

Never was a narrative more full of horrors, frenzies, unspeakable degradations, and overwhelming miseries than is the history of the siege of Jerusalem. Never was any prophecy more closely, more terribly, more overwhelmingly fulfilled than this of Christ. The men going about in the disguise of women with swords concealed under their gay robes; the rival outrages and infamies of John and Simon; the priests struck by darts from the upper court of the Temple, and falling slain by their own sacrifices; 'the blood of all sorts of dead carcases - priests, strangers, profane - standing in lakes in the holy courts'; the corpses themselves lying in piles and mounds on the very altar slopes; the fires feeding luxuriously on cedar-work overlaid with gold: friend and foe trampled to death on the gleaming mosaics in promiscuous carnage: priests, swollen with hunger, leaping madly into the devouring flames, till at last those flames had done their work, and what had been the Temple of Jerusalem, the beautiful and holy House of God, was a heap of ghastly ruin, where the burning embers were half-slaked in pools of gore. And did not all the righteous blood shed upon the earth since the days of Abel come upon that generation? Did not many of that generation survive to witness and feel the unutterable horrors which Josephus tells? - to see their fellows crucified in jest "some one way, and some another," till "room was wanting for the crosses, and crosses for the carcases?" - to experience the "deep silence" and the kind of deadly night which seized upon the city in the intervals of rage? - to see 600,000 dead bodies carried out of the gates? -- to see friends fighting madly for grass and nettles, and the refuse of the drains? to see the bloody zealots "gaping for want, and stumbling and staggering along like mad dogs?" - to hear the horrid tale of the miserable mother who, in the pangs of famine, had devoured her own child? - to be sold for slaves in such multitudes that at last none would buy them? - to see the streets running with blood, and the "fire of burning houses quenched in the blood of their defenders?" - to have their young sons sold in hundreds, or exposed in the amphitheatres to the sword of the gladiator or the fury of the lion, until at last, "since the people were now slain, the Holy House burnt down, and the city in flames, there was nothing farther left for the enemy to do?" In that awful siege it is believed that there perished 1,100,000 men, besides the 97.000 who were carried captive, and most of whom perished subsequently in the arena or the mine; and it was an awful thing to feel, as some of the survivors and eyewitnesses - and they not Christians - did feel, that the city had deserved its overthrow by producing a generation of men who were the causes of its misfortunes;' and that "neither did any other city ever suffer such miseries, nor did any age ever breed a generation more fruitful in wickedness than this was, since the beginning of the world."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: The Life of Christ, pp. 572-73, quoted by Bruce R. McConkie, The Mortal Messiah, Vol.3, p.433-434.

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on evil and knowledge

The knowledge of evil tempteth to its commission.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Life of Christ

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on liberty and neighbors

Man's liberty ends, and it ought to end, when that liberty becomes the curse of its neighbors.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on christ, mountains, prayer, unhappiness, and words

Concerning the prayer that mountains fall to crush and hide, Farrar , says: "These words of Christ met with a painfully literal illustration when hundreds of the unhappy Jews at the siege of Jerusalem hid themselves in the darkest and vilest subterranean recesses, and when, besides those who were hunted out, no less than two thousand were killed by being buried under the ruins of their hiding places."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.645 note, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.35, p.667

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on admiration, agreement, army, conscience, contentment, darkness, deed, guilt, infidelity, inspiration, jesus, money, murder, pride, sons, soul, suffering, time, traditions, vices, virtue, weakness, women, and world

Why did not this multitude of ignorant pilgrims resist? Why did these greedy chafferers content themselves with dark scowls and muttered maledictions, while they suffered their oxen and sheep to be chased into the streets and themselves ejected, and their money flung rolling on the floor by one who was then young and unknown, and in the garb of despised Galilee? Why, in the same way we might ask, did Saul suffer Samuel to beard him in the very presence of his army? Why did David abjectly obey the orders of Joab? Why did Ahab not dare to arrest Elijah at the door of Naboth's vineyard? Because sin is weakness; because there is in the world nothing so abject as a guilty conscience, nothing so invincible as the sweeping tide of a Godlike indignation against all that is base and wrong. How could these paltry sacrilegious buyers and sellers, conscious of wrongdoing, oppose that scathing rebuke, or face the lightnings of those eyes that were enkindled by an outraged holiness? When Phinehas the priest was zealous for the Lord of Hosts, and drove through the bodies of the prince of Simeon and the Midianitish woman with one glorious thrust of his indignant spear, why did not guilty Israel avenge that splendid murder? Why did not every man of the tribe of Simeon become a Goel to the dauntless assassin? Because Vice cannot stand for one moment before Virtue's uplifted arm. Base and grovelling as they were, these money-mongering Jews felt, in all that remnant of their souls which was not yet eaten away by infidelity and avarice, that the Son of Man was right. Nay, even the Priests and Pharisees, and Scribes and Levites, devoured as they were by pride and formalism, could not condemn an act which might have been performed by a Nehemiah or a Judas Maccabaeus, and which agreed with all that was purest and best in their traditions. But when they had heard of this deed, or witnessed it, and had time to recover from the breathless mixture of admiration, disgust, and astonishment which it inspired, they came to Jesus, and though they did not dare to condemn what He had done, yet half indignantly asked Him for some sign that He had a right to act thus.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.151 & 152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.12, p.169

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on eternity

No man can pass into eternity, for he is already in it.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Contributed by: Zaady

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