Francis Bacon

1561 - 1626

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on wisdom

in

The wisdom of the ancients.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Title of Work

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on age, companions, men, and wives

Wives are young men's mistresses, companions for middle age, and old men's nurses.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Essays. Of Marriage and Single Life

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on business, execution, judgment, men, and projects

Young men are fitter to invent than to judge; fitter for execution than for counsel; and fitter for new projects than for settled business.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on garden and nature

As is the garden such is the gardener. A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on beauty and corruption

Beauty is like summer fruits which are easy to corrupt and cannot last.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon

Gardening is the purest of human pleasures.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on lies and mind

in

It is not the lie that passeth through the mind, but the lie that sinketh in, and settleth in it, that doth the hurt.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Essays. Of Truth

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on confusion, errors, and truth

Truth comes out of error more readily than out of confusion.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on love

in

The speaking in a perpetual hyperbole is comely in nothing but love.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Essays. Of Love

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on belief, diligence, fashion, inaction, men, names, nature, observation, philosophy, reason, understanding, and words

But the idols of the Market Place are the most troublesome of all: idols which have crept into the understanding through their alliances with words and names. For men believe that their reason governs words. But words turn and twist the understanding. This it is that has rendered philosophy and the sciences inactive. Words are mostly cut to the common fashion and draw the distinctions which are most obvious to the common understanding. Whenever an understanding of greater acuteness or more diligent observation would alter those lines to suit the true distinctions of nature, words complain.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

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