Francis Bacon

1561 - 1626

A Quote by Francis Bacon on friendship, love, and solitude

"Little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love."

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Ayesha

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on revolutions

It would be unsound fancy and self-contradictory to expect that things which have never yet been done can be done except by means which have never yet been tried.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on words and mind

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There arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Hyperion, Pages: 179

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on nature, labyrinth, movement, pace, patience, and focus

Nature is a labyrinth in which the very haste you move with will make you loose your way.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: unknown

Contributed by: MsCapriKell

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: The Grand Abbot

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon

If we begin with certainties we shall end in doubts; but if we begin with doubts, and are patient with them, we shall end with certainties.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: DiamondLil

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on confusion, errors, and truth

Truth comes out of error more readily than out of confusion.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on laws, people, wealth, weal, supreme, and well-being

Judges ought above all to remember the conclusion of the Roman Twelve Tables :The supreme law of all is the weal [weatlh/ well-being] of the people.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: The Works of Francis Bacon By Francis Bacon, Robert Leslie Ellis, P.269

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on chance, good, and words

In things that are tender and unpleasing, it is good to break the ice by some one whose words are of less weight, and to reserve the more weighty voice to come in as by chance.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Essays. Of Cunning

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on business, garden, history, memory, men, mind, philosophy, power, science, and understanding

The men of experiment are like the ant, they only collect and use; the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes the middle course: it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. Not unlike this is the true business of philosophy (science); for it neither relies solely or chiefly on the powers of the mind, nor does it take the matter which it gathers from natural history and mechanical experiments and lay up in the memory whole, as it finds it, but lays it up in the understanding altered and digested. Therefore, from a closer and purer league between these two faculties, the experimental and the rational (such as has never been made), much may be hoped.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Francis Bacon, Novum Organum, Liberal Arts Press, Inc., NY, p 93.

Contributed by: Zaady

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