Ezra Pound

1885 - 1972

A Quote by Ezra Pound on ability, art, genius, perception, and talent

Genius . . . is the capacity to see ten things where the ordinary man sees one, and where the man of talent sees two or three, plus the ability to register that multiple perception in the material of his art.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Jefferson and /or Mussolini, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on heart and lies

in

The rustling of the silk is discontinued, Dust drifts over the courtyard, There is not sound of footfall, and the leaves Scurry into heaps and lie still, And she the rejoicer of the heart is beneath them: A wet leaf that clings to the threshold.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Liu Ch'e

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on age and grace

in

The age demanded an image Of its accelerated grimace, Something for the modern stage, Not, at any rate, an Attic grace.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. E.P. Ode pour l’élection de son sepulchre, 1920, II

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on america, country, and nations

America, my country, is almost a continent and hardly yet a nation.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Patria Mia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound

Winter is icumen in, Lhude sing Goddamm, Raineth drop and staineth slop, And how the wind cloth ramm! Sing: Goddamm.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Ancient Music

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on literature

As for literature It gives no man a sinecure. And no one knows, at sight, a masterpiece. And give up verse, my boy, There's nothing in it.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. E.P. Ode pour l’élection de son sepulchre, 1920, IX

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on adventure, fear, hell, home, imagination, learning, lies, love, men, and weakness

Better mendacities Than the classics in paraphrase! Some quick to arm, some for adventure, some from fear of weakness, some from fear of censure, some for love of slaughter, in imagination, learning later . . . some in fear, learning love of slaughter; Died some, pro patria, non "dulce" non "et decor" . walked eye-deep in hell believing in old men's lies, the unbelieving came home, home to a lie.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. E.P. Ode pour l’élection de son sepulchre, 1920, IV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on language, lust, money, and senses

And the betrayers of language ...... n and the press gang And those who had lied for hire; The perverts, the perverters of language, the perverts, who have set money-lust Before the pleasures of the senses; howling, as of a hen-yard in a printing-house, the clatter of presses, the blowing of dry dust and stray paper, foetor, sweat, the stench of stale oranges.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Cantos, 1925—1959, XIV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on fear, trouble, and uncertainty

See, they return; ah, see the tentative Movements, and the slow feet, The trouble in the pace and the uncertain Wavering! See, they return, one, and by one, With fear, as half-awakened; As if the snow should hesitate And murmur in the wind, and half turn back;

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on circumstances, emotion, and speech

Objectivity and again objectivity, and expression: no hindside-before-ness, no straddled adjectives (as "addled mosses dank"), no Tennysonianness of speech; nothing-nothing that you couldn't, in some circumstance, in the stress of some emotion, actually say.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Letter to Harriet Monroe, January 1915

Contributed by: Zaady

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