Emily Dickinson

1830 - 1886

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on life

in

That it will never come again Is what makes life so sweet.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: poem no. 1741.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson

Called Back

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: (West Cemetery; Amherst, Massachusetts) {self written}

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on grief and wonder

I measure every Grief I meet With narrow, probing Eyes - I wonder if It weighs like Mine - Or has an Easier size.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: 1862; Poems, Third Series, 1896.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson

To multiply the harbors does not reduce the sea.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: Letter, 1879; in Letters of Emily Dickinson, ed. Mabel Loomis Todd, 1894.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on faith, inventions, and prudence

"Faith" is a fine invention When Gentleman can see - But Microscopes are prudent In an Emergency

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, no. 185, ed. Thomas H. Johnson, 1955.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on faith

in

Faith -is the Pierless Bridge Supporting what We see Unto the Scene that We do not -.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, no. 915, ed. Thomas H. Johnson, 1955.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on fame and songs

in

Fame is a bee It has a song - It has a sting - Ah, too, it has a wing.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: Poem no. 1763.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on fame and food

in

Fame is a fickle food Upon a shifting plate.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: c. 1864; The Single Hound, 1914.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on friendship

Till the first friend dies, we think our ecstasy impersonal, but then discover that he was the cup from which we drank it, itself as yet unknown.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on birds, hospitality, and life

Our little kinsmen after rain In plenty may be seen, A pink and pulpy multitude The tepid ground upon; A needless life it seemed to me Until a little bird As to a hospitality Advanced and breakfasted.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: Our Little Kinsman

Contributed by: Zaady

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