Emily Dickinson

1830 - 1886

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on death

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Dying is a wild night and a new road.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on anguish

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For each ecstatic instant We must an anguish pay In keen and quivering ratio To the ecstasy.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: a collection of quotations found on the Internet.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on eternity and journeys

Our journey had advanced; Our feet were almost come To that odd fork in Being's road, Eternity by term.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: “Our Journey had Advanced”

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on failure

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Finite to fail, but infinite to venture.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on cats, idealism, justice, and pleasure

You remember my ideal cat has always a huge rat in its mouth, just going out of sight - though going out of sight in itself has a peculiar pleasure.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: Selected Poems and Letters of Emily Dickinson

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on world

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How much can come And much can go, And yet abide the world!

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: There came a Wind

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on time

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To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on life

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Surgeons must be very careful, When they take the knife!, Underneath their fine incisions, Stirs the Culprit - Life!

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, no. 108, ed. Thomas H. Johnson, 1955.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson

Let us go in; the fog is rising.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: Attributed last words; in A Certain World, Words, Last, by W. H. Auden, 1970.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on feeling and pain

After great pain, a formal feeling comes. The Nerves sit ceremonious, like tombs.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, no. 341, ed. Thomas H. Johnson, 1955.

Contributed by: Zaady

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