Elizabeth Wurtzel

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on depression and death

No one who had never been depressed like me could imagine that the pain could get so bad that death became a star to hitch up to, a fantasy of peace someday which seemed better than any life with all this noise in my head.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel

Nothing in my life ever seemed to fade away or take its rightful place among the pantheon of experiences that constituted my eighteen years. It was all still with me, the storage space in my brain crammed with vivid memories, packed and piled like photographs and old dresses in my grandmother's bureau. I wasn't just the madwoman in the attic -- I was the attic itself. The past was all over me, all under me, all inside me.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on depression

That's the thing about depression: A human being can survive almost anything, as long as she sees the end in sight. But depression is so insidious, and it compounds daily, that it's impossible to ever see the end. The fog is like a cage without a key.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on depression and love

I know I can do so much more than this, I know that I could be a life force, could love with a heart full of soul, could feel with the power that flies men to the moon. I know that if I could just get out from under this depression, there is so much I could do besides cry in front of the TV on a Saturday night.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on depression

I wonder if any of them can tell from just looking at me that all I am is the sum total of my pain, a raw woundedness so extreme that it might be terminal. It might be terminal velocity, the speed of the sound of a girl falling down to a place from where she can't be retrieved. What if I am stuck down here for good?

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on depression and suffering

Sometimes, I get so consumed by depression that it is hard to believe that the whole world doesn't stop and suffer with me.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on depression

What do you do with pain so bad it has no redeeming value? It cannot even be alchemized into art, into words, into something you can chalk up to an interesting experience because the pain itself, its intensity, is so great that there is no way to objectify it or push it outside or find its beauty within. That is the pain I'm feeling now. It's so bad, it's useless. The only lesson I will ever derive from this pain is how bad pain can be.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on madness and shampoo

You know you've completely descended into madness when the matter of shampoo has ascended to philosophical heights.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on love

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...what I really need, what I'm really looking for, is not something I can articulate. It's nonverbal: I need love. I need the thing that happens when your brain shuts off and your heart turns on. And I know it's around me somewhere, but I just can't feel it.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Elizabeth Wurtzel on depression

That's the one thing I want to make clear about depression: It's got nothing at all to do with life. In the course of life, there is sadness and pain and sorrow, all of which, in their right time and season, are normal—unpleasant, but normal. Depression is in an altogether different zone because it involved a complete absence: absence of affect, absence of feeling, absence of response, absence of interest. The pain you feel in the course of a major clinical depression is an attempt on nature's part (nature, after all, abhors a vacuum) to fill up the empty space. But for all intents and purposes, the deeply depressed are just the walking, waking dead.

Elizabeth Wurtzel

Source: Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Contributed by: Charles

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