Edmund Burke

1729 - 1797

A Quote by Edmund Burke on chastity and honor

That chastity of honour which felt a stain like a wound.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 332.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmund Burke

He was not merely a chip off the old block, but the old block itself.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmund Burke on age and chivalry

The age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists and calculators has succeeded.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on country and sleep

I would rather sleep in the southern corner of a little country churchyard than in the tomb of the Capulets.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Letter to Matthew Smith.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on people

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A people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. P. 117.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on ancestry, people, and posterity

People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. p. 274.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on skill

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He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 453.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmund Burke on action, harmony, politics, struggle, universe, and world

You had that action and counteraction which, in the natural and in the political world, from the reciprocal struggle of discordant powers draws out the harmony of the universe.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 277.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmund Burke on america, day, death, envy, manners, men, and world

There is America, which at this day serves for little more than to amuse you with stories of savage men and uncouth manners, yet shall, before you taste of death, show itself equal to the whole of that commerce which now attracts the envy of the world.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. P. 115.

Contributed by: Zaady

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