Edmund Burke

1729 - 1797

A Quote by Edmund Burke

He was not merely a chip of the old block, but the old block itself.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: On Pitt's First Speech, Feb. 26, 1781. From Wraxall's Memoirs, First Series, vol. i. p. 342.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on achievement, force, and patience

Our patience will achieve more than our force.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on virtue

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There is, however, a limit at which forbearance ceases to be a virtue.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Observations on Late Publication on the Present State of the Nation. Vol. i. p. 273.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on future and past

You can never plan the future by the past.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Letter to a Member of the National Assembly. Vol. iv. p. 55.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on principles

Kings will be tyrants from policy, when subjects are rebels from principle.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 334.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on abuse, danger, and power

The greater the power, the more dangerous the abuse.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech on the Middlesex Election, 1771

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on mind

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The march of the human mind is slow.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. P. 149.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on men

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Of this stamp is the cant of, Not men, but measures.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontent. Vol. i.P. 531.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on leadership and men

The men of England,- the men, I mean, of light and leading in England.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 365.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke

I am convinced that we have a degree of delight, and that no small one, in the real misfortunes and pains of others.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: On the Sublime and Beautiful. Sect. xiv. vol. i. p. 118.

Contributed by: Zaady

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