Edmund Burke

1729 - 1797

A Quote by Edmund Burke on affection and names

My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech, Conciliation w America, 22 Mar. 1775

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on government

And having looked to Government for bread, on the very first scarcity they will turn and bite the hand that fed them.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Thoughts and Details on Scarcity. Vol. v. p. 156.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on people and war

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I venture to say no war can be long carried on against the will of the people.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on ability, doctors, execution, imagination, leisure, meditation, military, nature, peace, planning, politics, society, study, time, and war

"War," says Machiavelli, "ought to be the only study of a prince;" and by a prince he means every sort of state, however constituted. "He ought," says this great political doctor, "to consider peace only as a breathing-time, which gives him leisure to contrive, and furnishes ability to execute military plans. "A meditation on the conduct of political societies made old Hobbes imagine that war was the state of nature.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: A Vindication of Natural Society. Vol. i. p. 15.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on power and wealth

All wealth is power, so power must infallibly draw wealth to itself by some means or other.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: 1789

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on ancestry and wisdom

The wisdom of our ancestors.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Observations on Late Publication on the Present State of the Nation. Vol. i. p. 516. Also in the Discussion on the Traitorous Correspondence Bill, 1793.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on nature and wisdom

Never, no, never, did Nature say one thing and Wisdom say another.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Letters on a Regicide Peace

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on age, beginning, chivalry, disaster, dreams, honor, insults, joy, justice, life, men, nations, thought, and vision

It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the Queen of France, then the Dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in,-glittering like the morning star full of life and splendour and joy. . . . Little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men,-in a nation of men of honour and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone; that of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 331.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on learning

Learning will be cast into the mire and trodden down under the hoofs of a swinish multitude.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 335.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on anarchy

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They made and recorded a sort of institute and digest of anarchy, called the Rights of Man.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: On the Army Estimates. Vol iii. p. 221.

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