Edmund Burke

1729 - 1797

A Quote by Edmund Burke on nature and wisdom

Never, no, never, did Nature say one thing and Wisdom say another.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Letters on a Regicide Peace

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on evil, good, and men

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: When asked what he thought of Western civilization

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on liberty and spirit

My vigour relents,-I pardon something to the spirit of liberty.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. P. 118.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on power

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I know of nothing sublime which is not some modification of power.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on religion and superstition

Superstition is the religion of feeble minds.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on business and patience

Taxing is an easy business. Any projector can contrive new impositions; any bungler can add to the old; but is it altogether wise to have no other bounds to your impositions than the patience of those who are to bear them?

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on affection and names

My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech, Conciliation w America, 22 Mar. 1775

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A Quote by Edmund Burke

In such a strait the wisest may well be perplexed and the boldest staggered.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontent. Vol. i.P. 516.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on originality and rest

Nothing in progression can rest on its original plan. We may as well think of rocking a grown man in the cradle of an infant.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on nations

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By gnawing through a dike, even a rat may drown a nation.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Contributed by: Zaady

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